8520 for 645 vs Hassy 8028 CFE

dirk

CI-Founder
Has anybody experience with these 2 lenses? Are there any differences worth to mention in real life photography between the 85/2.0 for Contax 645 vs. Hassy's Zeiss 80/2.8 CFE?

Thanks in advance
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
Dirk, I have both lenses. I will attempt a test for you.

I will shoot something with the 80/2 on the Contax 645, then using the Hasselblad to Contax adapter put on the Hasselblad 80/2.8 set on F and shoot the same thing.

I will shoot in studio with Profoto strobes and use a Kodak back to perform the test so everything will be equal.

I will shoot wide open, f/4; f/5.6/f/8 and f/11

Could be an interesting test.
 

dirk

CI-Founder
Thanks Marc,

that would be really interesting. Is your Hassy 80/2.8 the newest design? I know that Zeiss made some improvements over the time on the Zeiss/ Hasselblad 80/2.8. Especially flare reduction.

As far as I know, these improvements (the knowledge) are all incorparated in the Contax 645/Zeiss design of the 80/2.0, although it is a different design.

In general I prefer the 6x6 format (my personal taste). But I do want to see what's possible with the Contax 645 system vs. a Hassy 6x6 or Rollei 6x6 System - maybe later also vs. the Hassy H1.
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
My Hasselblad 80/2.8 is a late model CF, not a CFE or CFi. I think in controlled studio conditions I doubt anyone could detect the difference between a CF and CFi, especially with a shade in place.

I do have a CFE/CFi 40, 50 and 180... but I think the 80 would make a good apples to apples comparison.
 

daleh

Well-Known Member
> Re Hasselblad 80mm "improvements" I recently owned a silver barrel Hasselblad 80mm F2.8 lens. I emailed Hasselblad to ask them if the optics were the same as a new black barrel lens. There answer was that it is identical. The silver barreled T coated lens is over thirty years old. So, depending on how you look at it, a brand new, $1800 Hasselblad 80mm lens is either plain old 30 year old technology or one of the finest lenses ever made and Hasselblad is smart enough not to mess with it. Happy New
 

dirk

CI-Founder
mmmhhh, this ist strange.

In a conversation with Zeiss a few months ago, they mentioned to me, that the newest Zeiss/ Hasselblad 80/2.8 lens is a significant improved version of the older (similar) design of the Hassy/Zeiss 80/2.8. I will try to doublecheck this with Zeiss in my next meeting with them in a few weeks...
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
Yes, I was under the impression that the "significant" improvements were better flare control through improved matte interior; the newer PC contact, and better, longer lasting spring returns. I'm sure the lens coatings have been improved over the years to the state they are now. I believe the optical design remained the same, although modern computerized production may have improved over-all consistency of quality (then again, maybe not, given the quality of Hasselblad lenses over the years).
 
The 80mm f2.8 that was launched with the original Hasselblad 500C in 1957 was a six element design, which was updated to the current seven element design in the early 1960's, I think it was in 1961 but I might be a year or two out. The optical configuration has remained unchanged ever since, although there's been the coating and non-optical improvements detailed previously.

The current Hassie 150mm f4.0 has an even longer history, it was released right alongside the 500C in 1957 and is unchanged optically to the present day. And the current Hassie 250mm f5.6 goes back still further, its optical configuration dates from the Hasselblad 1000F of 1954 (even though it was then in a completely different barrel and was for a focal plane shutter camera). So here's a lens from the very top performance drawer, that you can buy today, and that will celebrate its 50th birthday this year! The Zeiss 38mm Biogon is also of a similar vintage.

Can you imagine just how outstanding these lenses must have seemed when they were fresh to the market? The only thing that came even close in Medium Format was the Rollieflex optics, the most prestigious of which were also from Zeiss.

By the way, please don't think I'm a complete camera nerd, I just happen to collect photographica from 1957 (the year I was born), so this falls into that area of interest!
 
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