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Black & White Filters Any recommendations for Landscape Architecture

G

Guest

I'm looking to get a couple filters for black and white and wasn't sure which filters might work best for me, not only in terms of colour of filter but also which intensity to use.

Something that would enhance contrast without making images look overly "surreal" if you know what I mean.

I know the principle of using like colours to lighten a particular colour and opposites to make a particular colour stand out, but I just lask the experience to make the leap.

Any help here?

Thanks,

Mark
 
G

Guest

Dear Mark,
I think I've understood you question. You want more contrast without bring in your photos an excessive artificial contrast (one of the most tremendous things to be seen,IMO).
For purposes similar to yours I always use medium toned filters formy Leica M lenses.
For lanscape I use a B+W Yellow Green filter. Don't mind the name they give. It's a green filter with a tone not so deep as pure green, but it isn't yellow. It helps you with grass, leaf and sky, with an effect similar to Infrared film but without the unreal effect of IR film. Use this filter with a 21mm f:2 Elmarit M asph and with a 90mm Apo Summicron Asph.
With the 21 Elmarit M Asph only I use also a B+W light red filter, only when I need to take a great portion of sky, full of cloud and I want to differentiate the contrast between the two elements.
Another good filter is the B+W yellow orange. This also isn't yellow, but a clear orange that enanches contrasts without solving grey tones. I use it on my 28mm SUmmicron M Asph andit work very well.
I hope that you will find usefull my help.
Sorry for my bad english,
Stefano.
 
G

Guest

Thanks Stefano for the help.

Will be out for a yellow green filter.

I presume that a blue filter might also help for doing architectural shots as well

Mark
 
G

Guest

Mark,

A blue filter increases haze. I rarely use it, however once achieved a stunning result on a tree which appeared normal, but everyting behind it was almost lost in the haze.

Stefano's recommendations are generally what I have used.

Also remember the filter factors are only a guide. You need to threshold test in both daylight and artificial light to determine the exposure correction. You cannot rely on thru-the-lens metering.

Also do not forget a polarizer.

All the best and have fun.

Justin
 
G

Guest

Thanks Justin.

Which M are you using that you say you can't rely on TTL metering when using filters?

I've always used filters on my Nikon F100 system and haven't had to adjust for filter factors at all.

As regards polarizer, basically do like to use one but need to get used to M lenses as I've only had an M7 for a month now with a 50mm 2.0. Just ordered a 21mm ASPH and am eager to see the color rendition on that lens. Also, polarizer on the 21mm is basically a no-no as universal polarizer won't work on it and in any case I'm sure there would be some vignetting.

Mark
 
G

Guest

> I'm looking to get a couple filters for black and white and > wasn't > sure which filters might work best for me, not only in terms > of colour > of filter but also which intensity to use. =================================================================

You will find that most of todays black and white films have such balanced sensitivity that the light and medium yellow filters seem to have little or no enhancement effect. So I would suggest you start your experimenting with dark yellow, orange, yellow-green, and green. You might also want to get one of the paperback books about filters such as the Tiffen filter manual or the Kodak filter manual. They offer excellent advice.
 
G

Guest

Also, polarizer on the 21mm is basically a no-no as universal polarizer won't work on it and in any case I'm sure there would be some vignetting. =================================================================

You are correct that most polarizing filters could cause vignetting. But a 21 mm lens has such a wide angle of view that the polarizing effect will not be uniform across the frame.
 
G

Guest

Dear Mark,

Apologies for the delay. Australia is either ahead or behind on time depending on one's point of view.

Regarding thru-the-lens metering with M cameras I have used M5, M6 and Minolta CLE, however the same principle applies with reflex cameras.

To be fair I am talking about fine prints and have found that yellow and yellow/green to be pretty close to the manufacturer's recommended setting, or the in camera meter is close enough. It is with Orange and Red that the film emulsions show variance and the sprectral snesitivity of the meter may not be the same. Nevertheless with architectural photography the full tonal scale is important and bracketing is another solution.

Sincerely,

Justin
 
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