Black & White TriX or what

jtcedinburgh

New Member
Hi everyone.

I love the results I get with my G2. I really rate it, though I've never really been completely happy with the results I've had with T-Max or Ilford Delta films.

I'm looking for a film which will compliment the razor sharp lenses of the G2, to really 'pop'. I imagine I'll develop the film myself with Rodinal, or give it to my wife who has access to a Kodak film processor*. I want to print to around 16x12" on RC to begin with, printing on fibre on occasions.

I've never tried Tri-X before - can anyone advise whether it'll give me the accutance I require, without being rendered too difficult to print by the high contrast of the Zeiss lenses?

I'm also keen on a sharp, defined grain rather than the slightly soft grain of T-Max - will Tri-X deliver with Rodinal?

Lastly, what B&W films are people settling on - conventional B&W only, rather than the chromogenic ones.

Thanks,

John
 
T

trisnadi

I stick with Ilford Delta at the moment, since Ilford chemicals and papers are easier to find here in Indonesia. I heard rumours that Kodak chemicals and papers will get here in coming months, but until that Ilford seems the only choice.

Trisnadi
 

nicolas2

Member
John,
Personnally I love the Tri X which the new name is 400TX. I used it during years with my Ms and I was wandering what will be the results with my new G2. My firt contact is great. What I love with this film that black is black, deep black very contrasted. (I don't like the Tmax too smooth for me).
Go to the TriX, it's a lovely film,

Nicolas
 

wbesz

Well-Known Member
John,

There must be something wrong with what you are doing. I find Delta 100/400 to be the best film for sharpness! But I use a good optics for with the enlarger, and a good scanner. Amazingly sharp.

Regards, William
 

jtcedinburgh

New Member
William,

It's not that the Delta isn't sharp =- it's very sharp - it's that it lacks a certain quality which I'm after. I can't really describe it - it's a slightly retro look, grainier but sharp, appearing sharper perhaps, because of its grain structure. I don't know, but Delta, and T-Max in particular, seem to smooth in the grain. I'm looking for a bit of characterful 'grit' without the golfball grain of 3200 speed films.

John
 

wbesz

Well-Known Member
John,

I understand. Then the new Tri-X is what you could try. This new version has less grain (I have tried it), perhaps you can try it at say 800 or 1600.

Regards,
William
 
T

trisnadi

You'll get good sharpness and smooth grain with Ilford Delta if you develop it using Ilford DD-X instead of Ilford LC29.

Trisnadi
 
J

jgban

Regarding chromogenic films, there have been some posts on the threads Contax User Forum » Photo-technical questions » Film recomendations, which film should i use and also in the review G2. Allow me to repost my recent post there:
I had also heard very good things about Portra BW. I used it recently and compared it to Ilford XP2 Super (not formal testing, I was just using the G2 with the 21mm for all the pictures during a recent trip to Spain and Portugal). I was curious about chromogenic films. Both films were processed by the same lab in the same batch. Afterwards, I scanned with the Canoscan 4000US using Vuescan.
This may be a significant source of variation, as the films have different colored masks (XP2 looks grey and Portra looks orange).
The scans from XP2 turned out with a wider range of gray (when you check the histograms in Photoshop). Both films are very sharp, and have very fine grain.
Actually, Portra seems to have almost no grain, which (and I never thought I would say this) I actually miss. I like XP2 better (and XP2 is half the price here in the US!).

Juan
 

dagata

New Member
John, my favorite black and white combination is Tri-X developed in D:76 either 1:1 or not diluted. It gives it the pop I think you're after. You could also consider HP5, which is Ilford's version of Tri-X essentially, but for that classic look it's Tri-x in either D76 or HC110.
 

ojingoh

Member
tri-x is not a very sharp film. it's commercial release was in 1954. for it's time it was a breakthrough -- a 400 speed film, when most films were 125 and color was 6/12. the best thing about tri-x is that it has great response to different developers, specifically compensating developers. rodinal comes to mind -- the compensation effect will enhance acutance, but sharpness still remains pretty mediocre. the grain structure "is" what 35mm film was all about, all until tab grained films such as tmax and delta were developed.
for sharpness with a fine lens such as the 45 planar or a leica asph you should really be shooting a t-grained film. that said, if you don't like the look of the grain (i'm ok with it for scenics/street, people though i prefer tri-x) don't shoot it.
 
D

davea

Portra works well as a C41 because its colour base suits colour paper

a good all round sharp film for c41 processing imo
 
B

bolshie

My favourite is Tri-X and HC-110 7mins at dilution1/31, you can rate it at 400 and 800 ASA on the same roll all lighting conditions with or without flash.
Been using this for over 20 years on the job and having tried most other film/dev combinations nothing else comes close for versatility and latitude.
regards
paul (bolshie)
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T

tvdweert

>My favourite is Tri-X and HC-110 7mins at dilution1/31, you can rate it at 400 and 800 ASA on the same roll all lighting conditions with or without flash. Been using this for over 20 years on the job and having tried most other film/dev combinations nothing else comes close for versatility and latitude.

Paul- cant say that I've tried TX w/ HC-110, but I do love the simple combo of TX and d76. To my eyes, TX is still the best BW emulsion out there; it has a wonderful tonal range and has just enough grain to give you that classic BW look. Its incredibly forgiving when developed; it's very hard to mess it up by developing it incorrectly. You can push it two stops w/out a problem. Did I mention it's great tonal range? I love the stuff and recommend it as a first choice to anyone interested in BW photography. TX is one of the few constants in photography - Carl Zeiss and Leitz lenses being the others. Regards, Tim v
 
W

writing4me

I had a look at your images, Paul, and they are remarkable. You have the decisive moment down to a science, and you must certainly have more courage than I do. Great work.
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By the way, in the color images, what film was that? -Lynn
 
B

bolshie

> Thanks for your kind words. The colour ones (excuse the red cast on one o= f > them there was a problem with monitor calibration) were taken on Fujicolo= r 400 > and 800. All the pix were taken between 1990-2001 mainly on Nikon equipme= nt, > the one of the two old ladies was taken with a Contax T2 . I only bought = my G2 > (second hand black kit) three days ago and have not had the chance to use= it > yet! It will be a rather strange experience as I haven=B9t shot any film or= over > nine months now as I went digital back then. I look forward to doing some= good > old-fashioned kind of work on it rather soon. > I=B9ve used the G2 before some years ago when I hired a body and lenses fo= r a > black and white feature on working class life in the East End of London w= here > I live (It is going to be exhibited at the Tate Modern Gallery here in Lo= ndon > sometime in December, so if you are nearby do drop in!) I must admit that= I > had a few problems with it then, and was rather put off, The T2 was bette= r but > I had to give it back. > The current kit was a rather impulse buy! A black body with 28, 45 and 9= 0mm > lenses plus flash in mint condition! > I look forward to trying it out! Any tips? > Regards > Paul > =20 >=20 >=20 >=20 >=20 >=20 >=20
 
W

writing4me

Thanks for the further info, Paul. Wish I was in London - I'd make a point to check out your exhibit at the Tate! Congratulations. I bet some of the other list members might be able to make it though. (I'm in the States). I hope you really enjoy the G2. I don't have it myself, but I'm sure if you have any questions the other list members would be glad to help you out. They're a good and intelligent bunch
Best, -Lynn
 

leo_jar

Member
I may say something about TriX. It is a very old film as said before and it is not a modern film and can't be competed with modern film in terms of sharpness and resolution. However, Kodak does not discontinued this film due to there are too many people love this film. When you check the datasheet of this film you may find that the high light of this film is compressed and the sharp of the grain structure is very unique... Tmax 400 has better and wide latitude and lose the taste of Tri X... Try lower the developing temp to 22 and longer time in controlling the grain development.
Few words from EX kodak professional staff.
 

daleh

Well-Known Member
>What makes you assume that Tri X hasn't been tweaked and improved quietly over the years?
 
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