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BLUISH HUE IN OUTDOOR PHOTOS

omarameen

Member
I have recently purchased a Canon G3. I took a few outdoor photos and they all came out with an overall bluish hue. HAs anyone else experienced this? Can I correct it by using any filters, etc?
 
K

kenglishpc

I have had the same thing, but I don't have an answer as of yet.
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
Set the White Balance for outdoors. If shooting in shade there is also a setting for that as shade has even more blue cast to it.

Read the manual.
 

omarameen

Member
I have gone through the instructions for custom settings. I am referring to shooting in the auto mode. Does it mean that we shoot only in manual mode for such conditions?
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
Auto mode has nothing to do with setting the white balance. WB (White Balance) is a separate function you can set in any mode of shooting, automatic or manual.

Look for "setting white balance" in your manual. All digital cameras have this function.
 

bellboy

New Member
I have a G5 and have noticed that when the ND filter (Main Menu) is on I will also get a bluish tint in some outdoor settings. Could this be the problem?
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
ND filter stands for Neutral Density.

Neutral means no color cast is added.

Density means the amount of light entering the camera is reduced.

The ND filter function is used in really bright light like at the beach or when shooting snow scenes. Conditions where the light is to bright to allow a shot to be taken because it exceeds the cameras' top shutter speed and smallest aperture combination. Or when you want to deliberately slow the shutter speed down for a special effect like capturing blurred movement.

A blue cast to your images means the white balance in the G3 (or any other digital camera ) is not set correctly for the shooting conditions.

To set the WB (White Balance) turn on your camera and then press the WB located on bottom portion of the main control toggle switch (located at the right top corner of the back of the camera).

A menu of WB symbols will appear on the bottom of your viewing screen. AWB and 8 other graphic symbols. AWB stands for "Auto White Balance" which is okay for most shooting conditions. BUT it is not perfect.

So the other graphic symbols represent other WB settings you can use to get better results. If your images are shot on a cloudy day they may look blueish...to fix this set the WB to the cloud symbol on that menu.

This is all in the manual.
 

omarameen

Member
Thanks to the information posted by Mr Marc. Since the G3 does not allow you to set WB manually in the AUTO mode, I tried his setting manual WB in the P mode and the results come out definitely better. However, I suspect that setting the WB to auto in this mode may produce the bluish hue again since the camera essentially goes back to all auto settings. I would tend to conclude to avoid AUTO mode in dicey conditions.
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
Omar, thanks for the information in return. I did not realize that WB could not be set when shooting in the AUTO mode. I never use AUTO with my G3, so I never knew that. I also always shoot RAW because WB can be altered after the fact when processing the images on a computer.

You are correct, AUTO is a compromise for the sake of convience. When in doubt, shoot in the Program Mode for convience...as P allows you to manually set the White Balance for the shooting conditions.
 

honda

Active Member
TO Marc,I to have the G3. have not used it in raw mode yet,"is there much if any difference"?-Also do you find that you have to change W/B much-I generaly leave mine on auto W/B.and use aperature priority or shutter.
Regards Gordon.(dorg)
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
Gordon, as I mentioned, Auto WB works for most regular shots, but is not perfect all the time. That is why Canon (and every digital camera) have other choices.

RAW is capture format that allows the most corrections after the fact.

To some degree, over and under exposures, different contrast, different color temp ( i.e., WB), color saturation and others can be altered from what was set on the camera when you shot a photo.
For ex&le, when you overexpose a J-peg, it is difficult to fix compared to a RAW file. You can also store RAW files on a CD-ROM like it was an original (i.e., a digital negative).

The disadvantage is that a RAW file is bigger than a compressed J-Peg, and takes up more room on a CF card. Plus you have to use the Canon RAW developer (File Viewer Ulitity) to process the images before you can take them into PhotoShop. The File Viewer Utility is where alll the alterations to a RAW file can be done.

So, if you want ultimate quality, with the most flexability to alter it later, then RAW is the way to go.
 

omarameen

Member
Are there any other software to edit RAW images? I remeber reading somewhere that there was a better editor than the Canon utility.
 
>Omar, There are three software choices of which I know. All are reviewed >on the Luminious Landscape site. Here is a shortcut to my favorite these >days, Capture One LE. >
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. The full >product is expensive but this one work well for my D60 conversions. Also >check >
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. I >also have and use the BreezeBrowser. See >
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. >I always capture shots in RAW. I have take to leaving my D60 to use Auto >white balance just because if I set it to cloudy I will forget to set it >back to daylight. As long as I am recording in RAW, it makes little >difference since I can control the white balance when I convert to a tif >file. I like Capture One because I can continue working while it does a >conversion and because I get the sharpest conversions with its focus tool. >Hope this helps. Fred
 
One more thing about using a tool like Capture One LE for RAW conversions. You can see the effect of the different White balance settings by changing the WB with the preview on. Then you can see how an incorrect WB setting turns your image blue. Fred
 

airmiles

New Member
I also noticed the blue tint first few times I used the G3 outdoors, before I dumped AUTO. My pet theory is it's down to the combination of flash and daylight confusing the white blance. Unless you 'warm up' the internal flash with some kind of red filter, I reckon you are always going to be stuck with some kind of compromise white balance in this situation where there are two different type light sources. Warming up the whole picure might disguise it, which might be what film does. As has been advised already, I'm tending not to use AUTO, but other modes where I can switch things like the internal flash off. If I really need fill in, it's OK to use when the ambient isn't strong enough to confuse the WB. Anyone think I'm wrong on this one?
 
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