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Checking Flash compatibility???

Bustoner

Well-Known Member
Hi everybody,

I have a good flash I was using on my old Canon,
a Centon FG105D



I need to know how to check if it will work properly, without burning out my camera ....or if somebody knows where to find a list of compatibility, I can't find anything.

The flash fits good on the mount, but I don't have confidence to turn it on.
 

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Russell2

Member
Hi everybody,

I have a good flash I was using on my old Canon,
a Centon FG105D



I need to know how to check if it will work properly, without burning out my camera ....or if somebody knows where to find a list of compatibility, I can't find anything.

The flash fits good on the mount, but I don't have confidence to turn it on.

Don't switch on it may fry the camera.
Check voltage output here.
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Although the pin configuration canon/sigma is the same iirc other things may not be.
 

DSG

Well-Known Member
There are lots of non-Sigma flashguns that can be used on the SD14...I use Metz 54mz-3.
 

jesito

Well-Known Member
According the Photo Strobe Trigger page (
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) your CENTON FG105D is volatage safe with the modern DSLRs. Probably you won't be able to use it in TTL mode (if that flash has it), but in manual and automatic modes will work fine. I use a Vivitar 550FD with no problems at all.

Regards,

Jes.
 

Bustoner

Well-Known Member
Thanks for all your advise

...but I found a strange problem with my Centon, when I was try to check with voltmeter, the voltage is even lower, 4,60v (and not 5~6v) ...but the strange situation happens when I was click to make a flash test, it makes normal light and a "BANG" sound, and a little smell of burn, then nothing works anymore ...but after I turn it off and wait 30 sec. then turned ON, now is working again and fine, without BANG ....this makes me scary if it happens again, worse if fitted on the SD14.

I don't know what to do, maybe better change the capacitor inside?
 

jesito

Well-Known Member
Thanks for all your advise

...but I found a strange problem with my Centon, when I was try to check with voltmeter, the voltage is even lower, 4,60v (and not 5~6v) ...but the strange situation happens when I was click to make a flash test, it makes normal light and a "BANG" sound, and a little smell of burn, then nothing works anymore ...but after I turn it off and wait 30 sec. then turned ON, now is working again and fine, without BANG ....this makes me scary if it happens again, worse if fitted on the SD14.

I don't know what to do, maybe better change the capacitor inside?

What you tell is usually a broken electrolytic capacitor that burns, it happens on electrolytic capacitors when they have been a long time without use and the electrolite dries. The same happens when you apply a voltage to the capacitor much higher than the rated one.
You should bring the flash to be serviced. If you say the flash is still working after this, probably the faulty capacitor is not the main one (the big one that stores the energy to light the flash). Since flashes generate high voltages inside, I won't risk the camera putting on a flash that has shown the behaviour you tell.

Has been that flash a long time without use?,

Regards.

Jes.
 

Bustoner

Well-Known Member
Thanks Jesito,

yes, it's about 4 years that flash never been used.

I think next days with some time, I will try open and check with my nose and a straw where the smell come from (Knowing the big risk of shock)

and maybe I will replace one or more capacitor anyway.
 

jesito

Well-Known Member
You're welcome.
The capacitor should be easy to spot: it should be open and a nasty looking brown paste coming from inside...

Good luck with the fixup!

Regards.

Jes.g
 

Bustoner

Well-Known Member
I have another Flash to use until I check the broken one.
It's a COBRA 700AF ....even this have many years without use ...Risk??

In any case, can I have confirm ....if, it will be always safe using any flash that have voltage lower or even to the original brand flash?
(Mean.... Sigma original flash unit makes 5.9v, so can I use any other flash with lower voltage?)
 

kakou

Active Member
I have another Flash to use until I check the broken one.
It's a COBRA 700AF ....even this have many years without use ...Risk??

In any case, can I have confirm ....if, it will be always safe using any flash that have voltage lower or even to the original brand flash?
(Mean.... Sigma original flash unit makes 5.9v, so can I use any other flash with lower voltage?)

Low voltage is fine. High voltage is not.
 

jesito

Well-Known Member
I have another Flash to use until I check the broken one.
It's a COBRA 700AF ....even this have many years without use ...Risk??

In any case, can I have confirm ....if, it will be always safe using any flash that have voltage lower or even to the original brand flash?
(Mean.... Sigma original flash unit makes 5.9v, so can I use any other flash with lower voltage?)

According Strobevolt, the Cobra 700AF is safe at 4.4 volt.

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Yes, you can use any flash unit showing a lower voltage in the hotshoe.The 6 volt or 12 volt upper limits that set manufacturers are the limits that the camera can stand. Using lower voltage flashes ensure that your camera cannot be damaged. Most of modern ones should be safe. The problem is for the older ones, that do not have a thyrystor unit to close the the trigger circuit inside the flash and can show voltages of hundreds of volts.

If the flash unit has not been used for years, you are in the risk of a dry electrolytic capacitor. Test the unit out of the camera, let the flash be running for a while, shot several times, and if nothing else happens, you can use it.

Regards.

Jes.
[/FONT]
 

Bustoner

Well-Known Member
Ok, I just finish to repair my Flash Centon, I found the wires of the Big Capacitor, in a point both wires was stripped and dark of burn (too much cable movement near a piece of sharp plastic).
I replace wires with stronger one, and now is working great

....voltage is stable at 4.90v and not 5~6v like on other flash web site.

I will test it better tomorrow, On Off flash - On Off flash - On Off flash....

:)
 

jesito

Well-Known Member
Ok, I just finish to repair my Flash Centon, I found the wires of the Big Capacitor, in a point both wires was stripped and dark of burn (too much cable movement near a piece of sharp plastic).
I replace wires with stronger one, and now is working great

....voltage is stable at 4.90v and not 5~6v like on other flash web site.

I will test it better tomorrow, On Off flash - On Off flash - On Off flash....

:)

Congrats!, and thanks for sharing.

Jes.
 

kcli88

New Member
Non Sigma Flash for SD14

I use Metz 36C-2 for my SD14, works good for gathering. a little bit small guide number (power)
Needed to adjust the Zoom Head for distant change, the traditional auto sensor work's fine on Manual shooting. 3 aperture user selectable setting.
ISO 200 2.8, 5.6 and 11.
 

Bustoner

Well-Known Member
So the Metz you are using is reported at 6 volts and works fine, thanks for sharing ....makes me more sure that the SD14 can reach 6 volts flash units.

Thanks, Bustoner
 
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