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Digital is round the corner but

G

Guest

One of Leica's strength has been the backward compatability of the R lenses.

It now seems as if those of us who've invested in expensive Leitz glass are going to be bypassed by digital.

I understand that the new Kodak digital camera will work with an extensive range of Nikkor lenses.

When I asked what Leitz had in mind, my dealer laughed.
 
G

Guest

I've heard that same laugh and am caught between wanting to go digital but wanting the sharpness of Leica film. Looking at the Canon 1Ds and the Kodak digital to be released next month and then I saw the Leica portrait of Martin Sheen and remembered why I want to go to sharper. For 9 years, I have been recording journalistic weddings in all lighting conditions and still expected to have a perfectly exposed image. Thus shooting at 800 (film), a human light stand with a remote flash and the Canon A2 and an N with USM lenses. Put a Q flash on top of all that on a bracket and it's about 25 pounds.

IF I was still doing weddings, the only way I would continue would be to go digital.

I've used Hasselblad and while I enjoyed the sharpness, what a bear to focus even with the sharpest focusing screens and then there is the size (I like working handheld) with small hands.

I'm tired of the weight of the pro Canon system and still want to be stelth but using a smaller camera. Time now to do MY artwork which is much slower and peaceful, taking more time for each frame while waiting for the scene and light to pop into place, using slower films, etc. I did journalistic weddings because it allowed me to not have to control the people being photographed. The artwork I do, requires even less control, something I really enjoy.

A few days ago I asked about which Leica I should get with TTL and am reconsidering the need for TTL since I'm no longer running any photographic races. Which Leica should I get if TTL is not an issue?

Thanks and I hope all is well with everyone. Cathy Fletcher Atlanta, Georgia
 
G

Guest

Digital weddings have the worst skin tones I have ever seen! And I've seen images from the Fuji, Canon and Nikon Digital SLR's.

Digital wedddings make it easier on the photographer, not the clients. Charging more for less work is what I've seen.

On the subject of the new Kodak 14n, production has been pushed back to March. No camera yet.

Canon's dropping the D60 for something new. A digital SLR with a 8 month life span!

Stick with film, Leica. Please.
 
G

Guest

Dear Cathy,

As much as the M6 has been the rage with a lot of people who have not experienced the earlier cameras, may I suggest as an all-rounder, with an excellent viewfinder and if serviced properly trouble-free, the M4. I have "used" every model Leica ever made with the exception of the M6 TTL and the M7, and my personal favourite is the M2 even though I have far more recent M & R cameras and lenses.

Best wishes and have fun,

Justin
 
G

Guest

As of this day, I have concluded the same. The pic of Martin Sheen really changed my mind about going digital just yet. Prior to seeing that image, I had forgotten how sharp an image could be.
happy.gif
Thanks Leica for the reminder.
 
G

Guest

Thanks Justin, I'll keep that in mind. Sure would like to get into the system without having to wait too long to afford it and your suggestion just might help. Thanks again.
 
G

Guest

Dear Cathy:

If you enjoy the 100% quality and convenience of the final print, which in this case is achieved by digital equipment and software application, then stay with digital. Digital technology can achieve beautiful results at the push of a button. The process will pull together experts and beginners alike to do wonderful images.

But film I think is more about the performance of the photograhpher. He or she will not always bat 1.000 because a good photograph is difficult to achieve. The image can be made better at the shoot or perhaps in the darkroom. Shooting film and burning a print is the arena where the photographer performs with the tools he has long gained knowledge of. Shooting film and doing darkroom is about labor and performance. . certainly not for those who don't want to get their fingers wet.
 
G

Guest

Where can one view the Martin Sheen photograph? You've piqued my interest!

Kip Peterson
 
G

Guest

If you go to the leicainfo site, to something like s&le images, gallery or portfollio you'll find it in there. It's quite something as far as sharpness goes. Cathy
 
G

Guest

Cathy, While I agree with Justin's comments, M4's are sought by collectors. If I were you, I would buy the M6 and keep the money you save to put towards another lens.
In 1984 I sold my M4 for more than I paid for the M6 new! There worse (better?) now
Colin
 
G

Guest

Thanks Colin, I appreciate your help. Especially since I ordered an M6 TTL yesterday since they are being discontinued. I look forward to many years of fun with this camera. Cathy
 
G

Guest

Dear Cathy:

I use 3 Leica M6's. I like the M6 because of the meter and TTL. I prefer the manual exposure over the shutter-priority exposure of the M7 because I can just as easily control the exposure myself. The less automation, the less to worry about. Go with the M6!
 
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