Exposure Meters for OM2n

isaiah6113

New Member
Hi there,

Just joined your forum and am darn glad to be here.

This is a little OT perhaps, but . . .

I have just purchased and OM-1n and an OM-2n and was thinking of getting an exposure meter.

If I look on ebay there are tons of used exposure meters to choose from.

So here's my ignorance showing . . . any recommendations as to make/model to look for?

Any input is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks,

Matthew
 

gjames52

Well-Known Member
Matthew:

Not knowing your needs, such as radio control, I like my Seconic L508 which at the time was the newest one with a built in spot meter, but just before they offer radio control for multiple flash operation.

Perhaps you might visit the websites for Gossen and Seconic and get an idea of what you might like.

If this is your first OM 2n I think you will find it produces excellent exposures.

Good Luck:

Gilbert
 

isaiah6113

New Member
Gilbert James (Gjames52) wrote on April 07:

' 2007 - 1:06 am,Not knowing your needs, such as radio control, I like my Seconic L508 which at the time was the newest one with a built in spot meter, but just before they offer radio control for multiple flash operation.

Perhaps you might visit the websites for Gossen and Seconic and get an idea of what you might like. '
Ok Gilbert, great advice thank you I will do so.

My wife has had an OM-1n since its launch and has loved it. My original thinking getting into a similar camera was that learning manual processes would help me to eventually take better digital pictures. That is, I have a Canon S1 IS and found all the pictures are sort of the same if you know what I mean. Not knowing about any of the manual settings, or the full power of the camera, leaves me with nice happy snaps, but nothing really lasting.

I have the feeling though that once exposed (pardon the pun) to the film world that I'll be immersed for some time.

I've bought several camera books from the 60s and 70s, which have been very inspiring. One was a from a discount bin, a beautiful coffee table book of the work of Margaret Bourke-White. I nearly dropped when seeing what she did with her camera.

Then I reconditioned my mum's old Brownie Hawkeye, the art-deco inspired little black box, you remember the one. I've been using B&W with that and have found it an interesting exercise. No adjustments of course, just composition. They produce great photos.

Thanks for the feedback,

Matthew
 

gjames52

Well-Known Member
Matthew:

If you read the OM 2N manual, learn the characteristics of the film you are using, and compensate accordingly, you will be well on your way to making good photographs.

I know you will enjoy the camera and will soon appreciate the genuis
of it's designer. It is versatile, small, light weight, quite, and is very reliable.

Regards:

Gilbert
 

weedram

Well-Known Member
Matthew: Is the meter in the OM-2n working and has it been checked for accuracy? If so, why not use it?
 

isaiah6113

New Member
Hi Earl,

It does work. And once I get a bit of scratch I'll be sending both my OM-1n and my 2n out for servicing.

I've just been reading up on exposure meters and thought it might be useful having one. I don't really know what I'm talking about though, all my camera knowledge comes from books!

As you recommend, using the internal meter will likely be just dandy. I'll have to buy some film and start actually using my cameras! I got my 1n about six months ago, and my 2n only last week.

Thank you for your response.

Best regards,

Matthew
 

omtech1

Well-Known Member
> If meter in the camera > is working, use (2) silver oxide batteries (357, Sr44W, G13, MS76, > KS76, 303) and you'll have a perfectly good internal meter. > It will speed up your shooting too. John, OM Service since 1977,
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weedram

Well-Known Member
Matthew: Thanks for the clarification. As John (and others) have inferred, the meter in the OM-2n is very good, within its limits, of course. It is NOT a spot meter; the weighting is to the centre as with many meters of the same era, though I don't know the actual pattern. I use my OM-2 (both N and "non-N") meters as is. I own several handheld meters, but all but one are in need of repair at this point in time. For really critical work I prefer a spot meter (though that is more useful for large format work), and for accurate but rapid use I prefer an incident meter.

But all that said, with experience the meter in the body is a very useful tool. And, as John said, it is faster.
 

isaiah6113

New Member
Thank you everyone for all your responses.

I'm very happy to have found this forum; I can see already that there is a wealth of experience here that you are all willing to share with those new to this hobby.

Thank you for your interest and care.

Best regards,

Matthew
 
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