Film recomendations which film should i use

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Guest

Hi there, i have been reading the posts about films, but i really mess up, what i want to know is which film you can reccomend me for:
B&W portraits
Color portraits
Color landscape
B&W Night street people shots
Perhaps i´m asking too much but i really have a mess in my head whith this "film chice" thing, which is pretty important.
So far the film that did'nt let me down for B&W portrait is the Kodak T400CN, but i know there is better...
About landscape, should i give a try to the Kodak Tmax 100 ?
Mostly i´m shooting whith an RTS I, and a Zeiss Planar 1.7-50 for portrait, and a Sigma 35-135 for landscape, and, next week i plan to do something healty to myself an buy a tripod.
Anyway i would like to preserve the freedom and quickness of a handheld photo, because i like to "steal" them to keep it the most natural/real i can.
Thanks already
 
G

Guest

Hi Rodrigo

I often do w&w shots. I most like the TMax series. I like the TMax = series because there's a higher contrast as on the Ilford Deltas - IMO. =

I most use the 400 ASA (TMY) for portraiture and landscapes too and = push it often one or two f-stops to 800 or 1600 ASA to work with=20 short aperture speeds (f-stops in the range from 1,4 to 4)

All colorfilms i use are the Fuji's (Reala, Sensia or provia)

cheers Dieter=20
 
G

Guest

> Hello Rodrigo, For basic color work, I shoot Fuji E-6 slide films. I like their Provia for most things and find Sensia to be almost exactly like it. (I've always understood they are virutually the same film, but that the Provia shows more uniformity in characteristics from batch to batch of film since it is intended for Pros, but that the Sensia might have slightly wider latitude in characteristics between batches of film - I enjoy both equally).

See Fuji Film for Professionals here:
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_CATEGORY_233844&product=

If you are shooting something in landscape that has bright sunlight and bright colors, you may also enjoy shooting Fuji Velvia. Velvia has an extra richness and ability to convey colors (warmly) that can sometimes be stunning if handled properly. Some feel the colors too extreme with Velvia - I think it depends on the situation. Never shoot Velvia on a muddy cloudy day, or you will be disapointed in it though. It is a sunny day and brilliant/bright color film to be sure, the colors will appear very saturated. (For ex&le, a good use of it might be shooting the Autumn colors on a bright sunny day)

If I'm going to shoot negatives for portraits, I really like Agfa print film. (Color Print Film) Something about the color balance that appeals to me. It is hard to find for me, but I like Agfa 160 Portrait Professional, I like the way it renders skin tones. Read about these films here:
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If I can't find that, then I go with Fuji 160 NPR Professional for Portrait Very nice film too. (Color Print Film)
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Sorry I can't recommend anything for B&W for you. I hope this helps a little bit.

One last suggestion - you might want to just do a little testing of lens focal lengths you are choosing for your portrait shots. You mentioned that you are using a 50mm lens for portraits now, but test out using an 85mm or 100 mm lens in the same situation and see which you find most pleasing regarding the persons facial features. You might be surprised at the difference in your shots.

Good Luck! -Lynn
 
G

Guest

I am considering purchasing a transparancy/negative scanner and have a couple of questions.
a. What is the best available in your experience.
b. When having transparancies developed, should I ask the processor to refrain from putting transparancies into individual slide holders?
 
G

Guest

Thanks Dieter and Lynn, i'll try your recomendations to see which ones i like, but it depends on which ones i find here !(small mountain town), i'll upload the best results.
Thanks again
Rodrigo
 
G

Guest

For part a), I can't compare the various scanners available, but I can say that I get excellent results using the Microtek 4000t. Use of the Silverfast scanning software is a huge help with _any_ scanner, in my experience.

for part b), one does lose a substantial amount of frame (10-20% in terms of area) due to the rounded corners of the slide mount, and also due to the fact that the slide can easily be slightly rotated within the scan frame.

So if your main purpose is scanning, getting your transparencies unmounted is an excellent idea.
 
G

Guest

David,

my unexperienced knowledge:
Reportedly the best scanner for home use is Nikon Super CoolScan 4000 ED. It provides 4000 dpi 48-bit images at file sizes up to 130MB. You will need a modern PC with lots of RAM.
The price tag is about $1700.

Drum scans are still better.
 
G

Guest

>Hello David, It seems from all the testreports given here in Germany over years, that the Nikon gear (Coolscan-series) is always among the winners. But of course others can do also a fine job. I personally use an "old" Canon FS2710 (still 2800 dpi) - I am very content with that too... (Its also fast! - speed not being qite unimportant for your work!) - Use always the highest resolution for critical work with excellent optics. Your Zeiss-lenses may even be higher resolution than the best Nikon-scanner allows you to resolve with ASA 50 film. Stay away from flatbed-combinations! By far not sharp enough!
 
G

Guest

> Reportedly the best scanner for home use is Nikon Super CoolScan 4000> ED. It provides 4000 dpi 48-bit images at file sizes up to 130MB. You> will need a modern PC with lots of RAM.

Yes , I would agree with this - I have one of these myself and am very happy with it . Not the cheapest around , but given the quality and features you get I think its money well spent. Steve
 
G

Guest

bw portraits t-max 100 or t-max 400 in low light


color portraits fuji nph 160/nph 400 in low light
or fuji npz(ngz?)800


landscapes fuji nps 160


night street scenes tri-x 400

Remember if you overexpose/underexpose and over development/under develop or use poor quality labs it will not matter much what decent pro film you use.

Also once you choose a film stick with it. You will learn what you to do and what it 'gives' you. It is is important to know throughly how to control the film.
Do not join the film of the month club. It will not aid you in making the images you want to make.

Good luck.
 
G

Guest

Some one posted a question on the G2 thread regarding which films are best for scanning.

For B&W, I have started using the Kodak Portra 400BW and it works very well in prints and scanning as well. Very fine grain with good latitude. It is a c-41 film so you can process it almost everywhere. I will try to post some non edited pics to the gallery for reference.

According to Fuji and Kodak, most of the newer films are optimized for scanning.
 
G

Guest

"I have been using Supra 100 kodak professional with my G1 setup. For a good day to day film (travel, street, landscape, etc) is this film choice ok? Can someone recommend a few others to demo? Thanks."
 
G

Guest

Anyone on this list ever tried B&W positive films? - I would like to find out the following

1 - Which brand makes them for 35mm
2 - Does it require special processing?
3 - Why use or not use it.

-Thanks,
 
G

Guest

>How well does it (Portra B&W film) print if you use an enlarger on B&W paper?
 
G

Guest

> > For B&W, I have started using the Kodak Portra 400BW and it works very>> well in prints and scanning as well. Very fine grain with good> latitude. It> is a c-41 film so you can process it almost everywhere.

I havent been following this thread , but I fully agree that this film scans very nicely indeed . I find I'm using it virtually all the time and getting great B&W digital prints at the end of it. Steve
 
G

Guest

> "I have been using Supra 100 kodak professional with my G1 setup. For> a good day to day film (travel, street, landscape, etc) is this film> choice ok? Can someone recommend a few others to demo? Thanks."

It really depends on what sort of results you are after and in what medium - presumably prints in this case . Personally , I would anticipate using different films for each of the subjects you mention - certainly street photography lends itself to B&W in my opinion , rather than colour . Steve
 
G

Guest

> >How well does it (Portra B&W film) print if you use an enlarger on> B&W paper?

Never tried it , but as good as it is I expect it wouldnt be as contrasty as traditional silver films . It has a good tonal range so you should be able to get decent prints in the darkroom too . Steve
 
G

Guest

> Anyone on this list ever tried B&W positive films?

Almon,

The only B&W positive film I know of is Agfa Scala. It requires special processing, and there are only a few labs around the world. There's no lab for it here in Hong Kong so I haven't tried it.

It has a good reputation for quality. The main reason to use it might be for projecting in a slide projector.

You can find all the info about it, including a list of lab locations, on Agfa's web site.

Regards,

Craig
 
G

Guest

> I have shot a number of cartridges of Agfa Scala and enjoy the ability to shoot black and white images of great permanence, without having to search for local B&W print processing. The Agfa site has a nice discussion of pull-processing (and shooting with ISO 100) to get less contrast, or push-processing (and shooting with ISO 400/800 to get more contrast. I have only shot it at the normal rating of ISO 200. Exposure should be fairly accurate to achieve the best results, as with all slide films. I have used mailers from Adorama sent to the lab in Miami, and have without fail gotten my slides back (cardboard mount, in approx. 2 weeks).
 
G

Guest

I have tried agfa scala before and I have been please with the quality. B&w slides are something different. Gamma pro imaging in Vancouver, B.C. is the only place I know that will deal with this film, and they send it somewhere in Ontario, I think. Have fun, peter
 
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