Film Technical Information

G

Guest

I have been putting the Contax T3 through its paces with Velvia for the past 6 months. I now would like to photograph low-lit street scenes and interiors without flash, using high speed transparency film. I would also like maximum grain. So if anyone has any ideas on films, ratings and processing, I would appreciate it.

I would also like to use Agfa's Scala film. I believe there are two ISO options with this film. How can I select one ot the other using the Contax T3 (there doesnt seem to be a manual ISO settings button).

Thank you for any help with the two queries.

Best regards

Greg
 
G

Guest

Hi Greg.

I do not have an answer for the first question. I never shot faster than iso 100, but I will try this in the furure.

For the second question (Contax T3 Iso setting):

The T3 does not have a separate Iso setting. You have to modify the Iso by setting under/overexposure in 1/2 or 1/3 stops. This you can costumize in the costum functions. It saves the information even if you turn the camera off.
 
G

Guest

Hi.
Available in UK, and I would assume in other countries are self applied DX labels. Maybe you could label one batch for one ISO, and leave another as the alternate ISO???
 
G

Guest

Greg,

Agfa Scala is nominally rated at ISO 200, but it can be used from ISO 100 to ISO 1600. Processing is not done by the universal E-6, so you have to send the films to an authorized lab.
 
G

Guest

Can anyone help with the issue of slide film development? I am aware of the problems of having colour negative film developed and printed at minilabs, but does the same apply to having slide film developed at minilabs? Is there a difference between having slide film developed at minilabs compared to pro labs. Thanks for any advice.

Steve
 

fly49

New Member
Steve

I would reccommend using anyplace that does not just rely on untrained people to use an automatic process. Pro labs and photo development at decent camera facilities should work a lot better for slides, as little or no lattitude available with them as compared to print film that can be off two or three stops and corrected easily.
 

ruben_blaedel

Well-Known Member
Steve
The advantage of pro labs is that you are able to by a 50 or 100 film processing rabate "card" making each development much cheaper. Most pro labs have quality checking of the chemicals ensuring a much higher quality aswell as they offer push/pull processing at resonable terms. Having paper copies of pictures from slides is always a bit more expensive than from negatives but with newer digital technique you can scan your slides, work on them in photoshop and give your prolab a cd with the pictures on. They can make real prints on silver based photo papers from the digital file - it actually looks very nice - and there is great advantage of being able to consult the professionals at the lab
 
H

hektor

Steve,

I have found the mini-labs dirty! That is miniscule foreign matter only visible on big enlargements or projection, as well as drum scanning. I suspect they "stretch" their chemicals and certainly do not wash completely.

Using a pro-lab for both has eradicated the problem and the price difference is not significant. In fact that is what one is paying for.

Justin
 
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