First specs of E300

ctburgess

New Member
As a potentially new Olympus user, I was really hoping to see alot more dialogue about this set-up, especially since it is being heralded as a "breakthrough." Obviously, I realize that it will not be released until December, but other photo forums have more discussions going on! (And they're focused on Nikon/Canon!)
 

bdcolen

Well-Known Member
What do you mean by dialogue? Do you mean pointless mumbling by people who haven't yet used the camera? You can get all the specs from Olympus. But until there are some decent reviews, what does "dialogue" matter?
 

biofos

Active Member
Listen not to any camera talk shops. Do your own research. In the forthcoming months log onto the mulitude of review sites and whenever the E300 is mentioned print the article. Don't expect any meaningful or accurate information until the camera is actually in production. This might be some time yet. Ask Olympus for information. Read the detail, not the headline. The E300 is by Olympus' own admission an OM10 equivalent (with E1 = OM1.) The breakthrough was the E1. Don't expect the new camera to be second generation E1; it isn't. That's the job of the E3. The E300 is aimed at the mass market and will be made down to a standard. There's nothing wrong with this strategy as, hopefully, it allows Olympus to recoup some R&D investment. Remember the OM10 was a good camera but it was not an OM1.

JF.
 

biofos

Active Member
A porro prism is an optical device similar to a pentaprism but is designed to "turn" the light through more than the 90 degrees a normal prism acheives on a standard 35mm SLR. This is achieved through a mixture of prisms and mirrors. It appears to be the same as used on the 60's Pen F. Here the porro prism "turned" the lightpath either 3 or 4 times - that is (looking from the top rear of the camera) left 90/ up 90/ prismed/right 90/re-prismed and out at the exit pupil. A tortuous journey that obeys the laws of physics. The result is a less bright at a smaller exit pupil. The E300 has a stated viewfinder image of 95% rather than the 100% of the E1 (that's physics.) It is TTL/TTL metered. It is unlikely it can be fitted with interchangeable screens. To gain light, that is the onboard flash, more important light, for composition, has been sacrificed. This is retro progress.

JF.
 

pjbw

Member
>I will consider changing my C-5060 for an E-300 only if the standard len= s on the E-300 has no barrel or pincushion distortion at the wide-angle s= etting AND it comes with a proper printed reference manual. I am an amate= ur egyptologist. Ancient Egypt is all about straight lines and mostly con= fined spaces and so a 28mm equivalent lens is essential. I had hoped that= my C-5060 would replace my humble Pentax 928 film camera which if anythi= ng, has a minute degree of pincushion distortion at wide angle (there is = considerable vignetting in very bright sunlight @ 200 ASA but I can live = with that). Reviews had mentioned that there was barrel distortion on the= C-5060 lens but I had not realised it was so bad. Provided (and now I ma= ke sure) that there is a straight line near the edge of the picture I can= visually correct the distortion with Paint Shop Pro 9 but it is that muc= h more hassle (using one distortion to correct another distortion!). > =20 > Peter
 

andy_radcliffe

Active Member
I wouldn't hold out much hope for a printed manual being supplied with the E-300. Probably a basic printed guide will be supplied ,with the full version on CD.I really can't see that this is a huge issue - after all, once you have familiarised yourself with any camera, how often do you need to refer to the manual anyway? It's not like you have to carry it around with you all the time. I would have thought that you would be better off with the 11-22mm lens maybe for your useage?

Andy.
 

jimblock

New Member
I'd be VERY surprised if it didn't come with a detailed printed manual (in the US, at least.) I've owned five Olympus digital SLR-type cameras (including an E-1); all have come with printed manuals, which are detailed and fairly clear. In Europe, however, the same cameras came with short manuals plus the detailed manual on CD.
 

mattinasi

Well-Known Member
I have not used any of the new Olympus lenses, but common wisdom is that wide angle zooms always have some distortion, usually not a small amount. You might want to consider a prime lens if lack of distortion is essential, but your choices are limited: a Canon or Nikon DSLR with expensive wide primes (17mm), or maybe something exotic like the Epson RD-1 with a Leica 21mm or the Leica R9 with Digital back and the fantastic ultra-wide 15mm (all of which will cost a pharaoh's fortune!)... Maybe I'm wrong, as I said I have no direct experience with the new Olympus lenses, but when has any wide zoom been distortion free?

Good luck! - marc
 

maury

Member
I had an opportunity to play with a pre-production E-300 yesterday. I'm looking forward to working with it longer once they're in full production. at 8MP It will actually have a resolution advantages over the E1.
It was nice to handle and even with firmware still to be corrected I found it pleasant to use.

I've been shooting previously with the C-2040, 3040 and currently the 740UZ and C-5060. I've always liked Olympus' ergonomics.
 

iberger

Well-Known Member
> [A Porro finder uses front-surface mirrors rather than a prism. Since the space between the mirrors is just air, not solid glass, it's lighter. I think it costs less to make, too.

More at
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]
 

ditto1958

Well-Known Member
Has anyone had experience using both the E-300 and the E-1? If so, how do they compare? Any recommendations?
 
L

Loren

I've not used either the E-300 or the E-1, but if you haven't looked at it already, DCRP runs some detailed reviews of digital cameras. The link for the E-300 is and the E-1 is
 
L

Loren

Let me try this again and see if the links appear this time. E-1
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E-300
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If the links don't appear, just google Digital Camera Resource Page. There'll be a link for the E-300 review on the left side of the page. At the bottom of the review page you'll find a link to the E-100 specs and review link.
 
N

N99fh

I have an E1 and E300. The E300 is good but I have only taken about 300 pictures with it. The E1 is very special to me (think OM 1-4 series)and gives great 12x16's on my Epson P2200. I have had it since Oct 2003 when they were released and taken about 8500 pictures with it. The software with the E300 could use a great deal of improvement. I use raw on both and process with Olympus Studio or Adobe Camera Raw. My choice would be the E1 but megapixels sell cameras. My car has more horsepower, mine is bigger that yours, etc. F Roberts
 

bdcolen

Well-Known Member
Yes, I am now shooting with both an E-1 and an E-300, and before I go any further - I am in the Olympus Visionary program and am given equipment... That said - the E-1 is definitely the better built, better featured camera. In fact, I don't think there's any question that it is as well built, and ergonomically superior, to the top Canon and Nikon cameras costing 2 to almost four times as much. Yes, the 5 mgp is limiting, particularly in terms of cropping. On the other hand, as I've said before, 5mgp can produce large, gorgeous images.

The E-1 is definitely noisier at 800 and up than the current Canon generation. But the noise problem was much reduced with one of the firmware updates, even though it wasn't part of the official list of fixes. I routinely shoot at 800, and don't have any problems doing so. If I have to go to 1600, I can. Let's not forget that 1600 film is "noisy," and so, for that matter, is tri-x at 800 - which is my film and speed of choice.

The E-300 is clearly the competition for the Digital Rebel, etc. It's well built for the money - has a solid feel to it, but is certainly not an E-1; but then it's not intended to be. Despite, or perhaps because of, the higher pixel number, the E-300 is definitely noisier at 800 and 1600 than the E-1, but the 800 is okay. At this point, I would kill to see two E-300 features ported over to the next iteration of the E-1 - the black and white mode, which is not only the best I've seen in any digital camera; it is superior to what I get shooting in color and using the FredMiranda plug-in in PS. It really IS black and white, and if you shoot raw with JPG, you get that black and white and a color "neg." The second 'feature' is the autofocus on the E-300, which is improved over the E-1. The E-1 autofocus is good and fast, but there are some problems with the 50 f2 macro, and some hesitancy in low light with the 50-200. With the E-300, the 50 f2 is a dream - no focusing delay at all; it's just 'bang on.' And the 50-200 focuses faster.

If you're looking for a pro camera, the E-1 is it. The only question would be do you buy now, or wait for the next iteration, which is said to be reasonably fast approaching. But if you're looking to save money, and the 8mgp is important to you, go for the E-300.

B. D.
 
N

N99fh

I am only in the Olympus Owners Club. I send $, they send cameras. I sent a lot for the 300mm but do not regret it. BD is correct in his review above. With the announced agreement with Panasonic it should put them in a much better position to compete with Canon and Nikon and really help the 4/3's system. F Roberts
 

bdcolen

Well-Known Member
They did NOT give me a 300 - damnit! - which I hear is an incredible lens. I had a brief loan of a 150 f2, and even though I am not a long-lens shooter generally, that is a long lens I do hope to own some day - stunning results, and handholdable even at relatively low shutter speeds. If you don't insist on being on top of your subject, it can be a terrific portrait lens - even though 300 mm (35 equiv) is definitely long for portraits.
 
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