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G2 general questions

wbesz

Well-Known Member
Austin,

I would ignore those ratings and choose the focal length you will use most.
I believe the rating are biased at the open end, and so you
will not notice any difference unless you always take photos
at max aperture.
(Nonetheless, I believe the 45 is my sharpest lens, even though my 28 is the most used lens!)

Cheers, William
 

erichard44

Active Member
> I think the issue is far more which angle of view you prefer, rather than sharpness issues. I have used both lenses and the 35 is consistent with the other G series lenses. Few lenses compare to the 45. The only other problem is that the 28 is so nice that once you have it you don't use the 35 very much.

. >
 

wilsonlaidlaw

Well-Known Member
Austin, I'm in the same dilemma. I think I've come to the conclusion that the 35mm is just too close to the 45mm to be worthwhile. If the standard lens was a 50 or 55mm, I might think differently. Pity - they are often good value in UK shops - sometimes as low as GBP100 but I presume this reflects their desirability. I regret that the 28mm is an f2.8 rather than f2, as I find when I use wide angles, I am often closer to subject and lighting is more critical. I assume that f2 would have vignetted as the technology is certainly there to make one. I suspect I will however, eventually get a 28mm. Wilson
 

afranklin

Well-Known Member
Hi Wilson,

> Austin, I'm in the same dilemma. I think I've come to the conclusion > that the 35mm is just too close to the 45mm to be worthwhile. If the > standard lens was a 50 or 55mm, I might think differently. Pity - they > are often good value in UK shops - sometimes as low as GBP100 but I > presume this reflects their desirability. I regret that the 28mm is an > f2.8 rather than f2, as I find when I use wide angles, I am often > closer to subject and lighting is more critical.

EXACTLY my thoughts as well, hence why I asked the question! Thanks for the confirmation.

Regards,

Austin
 
J

jgban

Wilson, Austin:

This is a matter of opinion only to a point. The angles provided by the 35mm and the 45mm are indeed different: 63° vs. 51°. (The 45 is actuallt 46.9, very close to a "normal" 50mm). How different is that?

The best answer I can come up with is on the Zeiss website, and unfortunately NOT on the 35mm section (so the images will be only an approximation). In the 6x6 section there is a page that shows the angle covered by different lenses looking at the same scene from the same point: This is the link:
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(if this does not work, just go to the Zeiss page on photo/cine lenses (
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) and go to Medium Format and then Hasselblad. There is a link called "Focal Length Comparison 6x6")

According to their table of 6x6 lenses, the difference between the 35 and the 45 in 35mm (63° vs. 51°) is similar to the difference between 60 and 80mm in 6x6 (66° and 52°). You can see the effect on the image from the link above, and everybody can decide if the difference is significant or not.

Is that significant enough to have both lenses?
This question is absolutely personal-- some people prefer one angle and some the other. I thought I preferred the "normal" focal length of 50mm until I started using a 35mm with the SLR. Now I have discovered I prefer 21-35-90 to 28-45-90. I would not carry 35 and 45 at the same time. But that is definitely subjective.

Juan
 

wilsonlaidlaw

Well-Known Member
Juan, I don't disagree with anything you say and when I bought my G2 I thought long and hard as to whether to get a 45 or 35 on it, especially as I would have saved about GBP30 in buying the 35. The pro-shop I bought it from did not have a black 35 in stock and I thought a black body and Ti lens would look pretty odd and I had in mind that I would eventually want a wider lens. This would have to be the 28mm as I am not prepared to mess around with top viewfinders for the 21mm on a "carry around" camera. I might as well then carry my RX with an ultra wide zoom I have. If I had bought the 35mm as my standard lens, I would then be in the same dilemma that both the 45mm and the 28mm would look too close to what would be my standard lens of 35mm. Given unlimited funds and a Sherpa porter to lug everything around, I would like all five prime lenses plus the zoom - dreams, dreams! Wilson
 
I'm considering buying the 28mm lens(I have the 45) but am concerned about postings regarding the difficulty encountered when switching lens.

Please advise just how tricky or frustrating this is. I bought the N24-85 to keep lens switching/equipment to a minimum when I travel. However, the rebate offer is tempting me to consider another piece of equipment.

Thanks.
 

arrow

Member
No problem i've noticed putting the 28mm on. The back of the lens extends into the body way more than a 45 so you do need to intall it carefully so maybe takes 45 seconds to switch vs. 30. You will love the 28!
 

erichard44

Active Member
> I would agree with the previous post. The lens changing is slower than with a slr, and with the 28 one is also concerned about the exposed lens elements. It just takes a bit more care. On the other hand, the results are worth it.

>
 

afranklin

Well-Known Member
Question on the G2 and the TLA-200. The manual doesn't say what to set the shutter speed dial to when using the TLA-200 in TTL mode, but it eludes to simply setting it to "Auto"...and has a chart that says it uses 60 up to 200, depending on the light meter reading... Can anyone explain why it would want to do that, instead of simply using 1/200 (X)?

I noticed that when I set it to X with the TLA-200 in TTL mode, the underexposed down arrow is indicating and is solid (not blinking). I believe I know what a blinking down arrow means (I believe the manual says it means underexposure when blinking), but what does a solid down arrow mean, and why on earth would the down arrow be indicating when using X with the TLA-200 in TTL mode? I'm sure it wants me to set it to "Auto", but I'm still not understanding why...shutter speed shouldn't be an issue for flash, as long as it's equal to or slower than the sync speed, and the camera can sync at 1/200...

Regards,

Austin
 

coodeville

Well-Known Member
Austin:
It has to do with fill flash. What you would want to achieve is an EV that has a shutter speed of your synch speed or slower that also has the aperture that fits into the camera distance range. So therefore, if yout set the camera to 1/200 when the amient requires 1/60, your flash will be acting as a main light source and not a fill. Doing this, you will neot get the proper bablance between ambient and flash exposure in a fill flash situation.

1/200 or "x" would be fine shooting at night or in a dim indoor situation where the camera flash is the main source of light. The shutter speeed is not that important unless you want to burn in more detail from your background.

I myself always shoot in manual exposure mode when I use the TTL flash control on the TLA 200 for fill on My G2. That way, I control the ambient within the synch range.

I was never a big flash shooter with the G2 because my Nikon works much better in flash situations. But I have found that using manual in fill flash situationson the G2 works best
 

afranklin

Well-Known Member
Hi Michael,

> It has to do with fill flash. What you would want to achieve is an EV > that has a shutter speed of your synch speed or slower that also has > the aperture that fits into the camera distance range.

I do understand how fill flash works, and you may very well be right, but I see it as a source of potential problems, irrespective of why they may have done it.

> So therefore, > if yout set the camera to 1/200 when the amient requires 1/60, your > flash will be acting as a main light source and not a fill.

But...this is not for fill flash, this is simply for flash, where the flash is the main light source...if I want fill flash, I can set that up on my own by using manual exposure. I would really want to use manual exposure to do fill flash anyway, unless what I am metering on is right in the middle of the image.

BTW, I posted the meter plot for the G2 here:

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It's VERY center weighted, and for me, may be an excellent meter pattern, as I prefer spot meters.

> The > shutter speeed is not that important unless you want to burn in more > detail from your background.

Shutter speed sure is important if you don't want to get motion in the image in a higher ambient light situation, especially with the 90. If I can simply use 1/200 (X) without any problem, with the TLA-200 in TTL mode, then that solves the problems their implementation may cause me...but the question remains as to why it gives me the "underexposure" indication...I guess I'll have to burn a roll of film and try the different modes and see what happens.

Thanks for your comments,

Austin
 

coodeville

Well-Known Member
<But...this is not for fill flash, this is simply for flash, where the flash is the main light source...if I want fill flash, I can set that up on my own by using manual exposure. I would really want to use manual exposure to do fill flash anyway, unless what I am metering on is right in the middle of the image>

Don't most camera's mark there synch speed? I guess that's how Kyocera does it.

<But...this is not for fill flash, this is simply for flash, where the flash is the main light source...if I want fill flash, I can set that up on my own by using manual exposure. I would really want to use manual exposure to do fill flash anyway, unless what I am metering on is right in the middle of the image>

You just answered your original post with this answer.

<Shutter speed sure is important if you don't want to get motion in the image in a higher ambient light situation,>

Of course! But wouldn't you already know that if you decided to burn in the background? Modes Pones? I've frozen action with 1/30.
 

gjames52

Well-Known Member
Austin:

The TTL system is basically designed to work in Auto like other TTL and TTL OTF systems and will provide flash below the sync speed. The confusion begins with their term “Aperture-priority Auto Exposure” page 146, which is Auto

Manual X and bulb page 147 Also for non-TTL flash units.

Rather than trying to decipher the manual it does provide the information all be it confusing. On page 156 fill flash using the AEL to lock exposure works like Hasselblad TTL OTF fill flash in that it will expose the background and provide flash. The arrows indicate over or under exposure and require selecting an appropriate aperture. Also page 154

On good thing about the solid 16 flashing arrow unless in darkness you can bet you have the lens cap on.

The AE lock also work like Hasselblad in that your can lock a reading and make several exposures. It does warn you that the exposure is locked by flashing the exposure in the viewfinder. Unlike the static L.

Also setting custom setting 1 to 1 the shutter release will lock both focus and exposure like most point and shoot cameras. It will also revert to the standard function by setting the AEL for exposure then you can focus and or focus lock at a different distance than the locked exposure. And the exposure will blink.

In manual mode, focus the distance can be shown on the viewfinder by pressing the focus lock. The exposure reading will change to show the distance. Unlike any other camera I own or have used, none show the distance in the viewfinder.

Regards

Gilbert
 

bimmer

Member
Why/when would one want to lock AE and AF at the same time? And why/when would you NOT require AE and AF to lock? Can someone help me understand? Thanks. > >
 

wilsonlaidlaw

Well-Known Member
The situation where I commonly want to lock the exposure but not the focus is when I am shooting into the sun. I then take the exposure from behind me turn round and compose/focus the picture I want into the sun. The focus distance behind me is irrelevant to what I am taking in front of me. I sometimes have to use manual focus as the sun can scramble both the image convergence and the IR. Wilson
 

hdfuhrman

Active Member
Wilson,
I am not sure I understand what you said. It sounds like a technique I want to learn. Could you explain your technique again in other words as to shooting into the sun. What is your subject and what do you want to have have proper exposure? What do you want in proper focus? Are you photographing people, landscape, building, etc?

Howard
 

wilsonlaidlaw

Well-Known Member
Howard, This is a very simple technique, which seems to work well for a wide range of subjects mainly people and buildings and to a lesser extent landscapes. The idea is you find a somewhat similar subject behind you and by locking the exposure on that subject (I usually flick the AEL lock switch, having rather arthritic fingers, I am not wholly confident about holding the shutter button continuously half depressed) you are effectively making the assumption that the incident light on the exposing subject behind you will be correct for the subject into the sun. It is more than often a correct assumption. A more advanced technique is as follows: This works better with an RX set to the spot meter function although the G2 seems to be so centre weighted that it is close to spot. I have a proper Polaris 3 degree spot meter but I have found that the answers I get from either the G2's or RX's built-in meters are near enough to the Polaris, well within the latitude of modern films. The idea is to use the zone exposure method and lock on light shadows, where you can make out good detail (number 3 in the 1 to 9 Ansel Adams scale ignoring 0-dead black and 10-pure white) behind you and then compensate minus 1 to 1 2/3 stops as one feels might be correct. If I remember correctly from my photographic studies over 35 years ago, each scale number is roughly equivalent to one EV. With the very wide contrast range of modern films, in theory, we could use a 13 number scale but I don't think that I for one, can differentiate and mentally number 13 contrast levels in a few seconds. You should have a developed film averagely correctly exposed, again in theory, for scale number 5, mid point of contrast but to maximise the real world contrast levels, nearer 4 is probably better. Particularly with black and white, there was a very good old maxim - expose for the shadows and print for the highlights. It does not fully apply for colour but it still has relevance. If you try this for a few films, you will soon get a feel for the compensation you need. With colour, it is easier to correct a slightly over-exposed film than under. The cheapest way to play with this technique and to learn it is to use a good digital with lots of variable parameters. Wilson
 

gjames52

Well-Known Member
Why/when would one want to lock AE and AF at the same time? And why/when would you NOT require AE and AF to lock? Can someone help me understand? Thanks. > >

One instance is:
Perhaps your subject has some unusually bright or dark subject and the opposite background making it difficult to meter correctly. And perhaps near the subject at a different distance is a mid-gray area that you can lock your camera exposure reading and then focus on the subject and recompose for your exposure. Basically you are trying to overcome reflected meter errors e.g. such as measuring snow. Of course there are other options as Wilson mentioned exposure compensation for the condition. Experiment you will have some fun.

Also, Snow or a dark subject you will need to correct for exposure using one method or another.

Regards

Gilbert
 

bimmer

Member
Ok. So i understand how one would need AE Lock. Perhaps even how AE Lock would be useful when tied to AF Lock at the same time. But when would you need to have AE Lock separate from AF Lock? (Please give an ex&le.) Wouldnt your subject be the point of focus all the time and wouldnt you want your subject to be properly exposed? (eg. a human face in the shade on a bright day). So why/when would one want AE and AF not tied together? TIA. >
 
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