G2 Polarizers

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I'm confused (as usual) about which kind of polarizer to get for my G2. I would be using it with the 45mm and 28 mm lenses. Circular or linear, and If circular, how do you know how to set it (what level of polarizing).
Thanks in advance for any advice!
Jeff
 
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No need for a circular polarizer with the G, a linear will do. Be sure to get one with an alignment mark so you can transfer the setting to the filter when it's mounted on the camera (it almost seems as though it would be a good idea to carry two: one mounted on the camera and one handheld to use for previewing).

--Rick
 
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I recognize that the circular polarizer costs more than the linear but is there any differences in quality or use on G1 or G2. Thanks.
Harbert
 
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Heliopan makes a linear Polarizer with markings 1-10. I use it on my Voightlander Bessa R2. I love it! Number 5 gives me the most dramatic Polarizing effect on the sky. Plus its great (Shott) glass same as Zeiss right! Kevin
 
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Kevin,
Where did you get your Heliopan? Also, don't you have to turn the polarizer based upon the angle of the light at the time of the picture and not just #5 on the polarizer or is that only with circular polarizers? Thanks.
Harbert
 
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Harbert,
There should be no difference in quality between a linear polarizer or circular polarizer assuming of course they are of equal quality. All polarizers need to be rotated to acheive the desired effect. The need for a circular polarizer arises when using a polarizer with an autofocus slr. Linear polarizers can interfer with your autofocus when used with those systems. The G2(1) is an autofocus rangefinder and as such the filter you put on front of your lens has no effect with the focusing mehanism which takes place via the little windows on your camera, not through the lens. So spending a premium for a circular polarizer for a G2 is a waste of money. The amount of effect you see when rotating polarizers will vary quite a bit during the day as the angle of the sun changes. Jeff, when I use a polarizer I generally want the most dramatic effect I can get from it. That means darker sky and more saturated colors. This makes it easy to use since this configuration corresponds to the filter's highest filter factor. So I just set my desired aperature and rotate the filter while watching my shutter speeds change. The position which gives me the longest shutter speed for that aperature is the setting I want for the filter.
 
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> Harbert I got my Heliopan from B&H (39mm was $31.95usd) When I say I use #5 for sky I mean when my damera is level and I'm getting part sky with the sun mostly behind. Of course for a surface at a different angle you would need to remove and view with your eye then note the number that is top center. Also this helps if you decide you want to turn your camera vertical from Horizontal you just need to twist until this # is top center again. Kevin
 
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> Harbert Paul is right! I always forget to use this little filter factor trick--Though my Bessa does not show third stops so this may be difficult for me.

Paul Thanks for the reminder! Kevin
 
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Paul..
Thanks once again for the great response. I picked up a cheap circular polarizer yesterday, just to give it a try..and did exactly what you recommended. I don't have the pictures back yet, but thought I'd give it a try.

I found a new 28mm Biogon for $280, which I thought was a pretty good deal.

Jeff
 
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Paul,
Thanks for the excellent summary on polarizers. I am getting back to my roots with Contax G2 systems after years with Minolta systems. I had used a circular polarizer with Minolta but had never used the linear one. I read this forum almost every day and learn new things and re-learn things I should have remembered but didn't. Thanks to all.
Harbert
 
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>I've been considering getting a polarizer for a long time, but I've been debating if I should get it for the G2 or on my slr. Which is easier to use? Thanks.
 
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Ming,
A polarizing filter is much easier or more user friendly with an SLR due to the fact you are seeing the image directly through the lens and filter. Also the finder provides a nice dark environment with little stray light where you can see subtle changes as you rotate the filter. If you simply hold a polarizer to your eye and turn it you will not experience the full range of the filter due to the ambient stray light.
 
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The only time there might be problem using a polariser with an SLR is when, as I recently discovered, you try to use it while wearing polarised sunglasses. Mine have prescription lenses so they normally help me to see! In this case the polarised glasses interacted with the polarising filter and caused the viewfinder to go black and virtually impossible to use - solution, take off the glasses!
John
 
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>Paul, Thanks for the quick reply. Although it is much easier to use the polarizer with a slr, is the results with the G2 worth the extra effort?
 
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Ming Ting, and all,
There have been many tips regarding the use of a polarizer on the G2-all of which work well. Why not get one polarizer and use it on both the G2 and your slr lenses. Most of my CZ lenses use the 55mm filter so it is a simple matter to purchase a 55mm polarizer for the (most) CZ lenses for slr AND also purchase a 46mm to 55mm step up ring to use the same filter on the G lenses.
 
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I think getting the step-up ring is a great idea. B+W makes a high = quality 46/55 step-up ring. Many others are junk.
 
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>Hi Ron, Most of my slr lenses are 62mm and up. It would take several step up rings to go from the 46mm. This would probably interfere with the 28mm lense wouldn't it?
 
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Ming,
I would say there is a chance that the larger filters might cause focusing problems. If you are near a dealer, perhaps you could take the G camera with 28mm. First focus on many different objects and record the indicated (in the status window) focus distance. Now screw on a step up ring, say, a 46mm to 62mm and focus on the same objects and compare the indicated focus distance to the previous test. If the distances do not agree, then there is a problem. If the distances do agree, then proceed up to your next larger filter size with step up ring and repeat process. If you try this, would you let us all know how it works? I am many miles from any dealer out here in the desert of New Mexico.
 
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Wouldn't a 67mm step-up ring take a big bite out of the viewfinder window? Also, given that few polarizing filters are coated, the need for a lens hood becomes even more important. I'd stick with a 46mm and place the lens hood on top.

--Rick
 
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>Niki,

Hey there, are you trying to send a msg? I don't think you are doing it correctly? How's it going?
 
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