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G3 or G5

A

achim

Hi,

so I will start here with my question as the first one. I am thinking about buying a G3 or G5.

I read some reviews that the G5 is actually not worth the additional price. It would give more noise and for the normal user the G3 would be sufficient.

Does anybody has an opinion/experience with one of them?

Thanks
 

honda

Active Member
Hi Achim, I have and use a G3. Shots-Good BUT optical veiwfinder poor, lens obstructs part of view. Difficult to see lcd screen, (though I have not tried a bellows shade yet. Have you read dp-review on G3 G5. he says not worth paying extra for G5. Friend of mine uses a Fuji Digi Much better finder almost slr quality. I think if I had seen this one first may not have bought G3.
I also use Canon film camera EOS 3 Realy good. Use it with Microtek 4000t film scanner.
What i`m saying is try others as well before you make your mind up.
Hope this helps.- Gordon.
 

jesper

New Member
Hello Achim,

I have the G3. I have read reviews and looked at the specs of the G5 and so far the only difference between the G3 and the G5 I've found is 4 vs 5 megapixels. For the rest, the G5 is exactly the same as the G3 (even all the menus etc. are exactly the same). In my opinion the G5 doesn't justify the price difference.

Jesper
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
Achim, there are more slight differences than 1 meg. The G5 comes in black, has a bit of an improved shutter lag, utilizes Canon's latest in camera processing...
 
H

howard

Marc,
Is the decrease in shutter lag significant? Or is it just a slight improvement?

Howard
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
Howard, I have the G3, S-50, and G5. I purchased the G5 on the basis that even a little more resolution is worth it at that end of the megapixel spectrum. Same for any improvement in shutter lag time. The claim by Canon and theCanon dealer was somewhat improved performance in both areas. Again, it is personal opinion as to whether it is worth the money. To me it is.

On photo.net, Leica forum we just did a friendly "street shootout" to evaluate various P&S digitals against Ms to see if decisive type work could be proformed with the little digitals.
I used a G5, Contax TVSD and a Leica M7 with 2 lenses (50 & 90 ). The G5 did quite well in two areas... by shutting off the LCD and shooting with the viewfinder, I was able to catch decisive moments, and with the LCD turned on I could catch candids without the subject being aware (same can be done with the G3). I detect a minor amount of improvement in the shutter lag in practical application. But any improvement is enough for me.
 

sclamb

Well-Known Member
There are some points in the texts above that are not entirely correct. Firstly, the G5 does not use any 'latest in-camera processing'. Both the G5 and G3 use the same Digic processor with no changes. From a performance aspect, the shutter speed difference is so low that you would not notice any improvement, if indeed there is any.

Lastly, and the big reason I kept the G3, the colour fringing on the G5 is abysmal. You need to be stopped down to around F8 to get rid of the purple fringing around high contrast edges and it's significantly worse than the G3, which gets rid of such abberations by around f/3.5 to f/4.

Unless you need the extra megapixel, and you can live with the inferior image processing causing the fringing, then go for the G5. Otherwise, save a couple of hundred and get the G3.

Simon
 

bnlgrabows

New Member
> [Hi Simon Your comparison of the Canon G3 and G5 was very interesting. Currently, I have a Canon EOS elan II and I am tired of lugging around the camera, battery pack, and a couple of lens. I am considering the G5 because I wanted the ability to blow up portion of the frame. I am used to shooting with telephoto lens so, if I go to a digital without that much telephoto horsepower, I want to be able to enlarge a portion of the frame to get the telephoto affect.

Your commentary has given me second thoughts about the G5. I was also looking at the new Nikon 5 megapixel camera. I know this is a Canon web site but I was wondering if you had any knowldege of the Nikon.

Hoping to hear from you.

Bernie > ..]
 

iberger

Well-Known Member
If Bernard Grabowski is "tired of > lugging around the camera [EOS Elan II], battery pack, and a couple of lenses," he might be better off getting a 5-megapixel zoom-lens reflex like the Nikon 5-MP he mentions, or the Minolta equivalent. My own Minolta 7i, with the equivalent of a 28-200mm zoom (f/2.8 at WA) weighs about as much as the slower 28-200 zoom I use on my EOS film bodies. (The Nikon does not go as wide, but goes longer, which might be more to his taste.)

Of course, it all depends on the lenses he's lugging. For instance, I know no digital camera with the equivalent of the 24mm f/2 I use on my OM-2.

The Olympus E-1, a digital reflex with interchangeable lenses, has a body not much smaller or lighter than an EOS. On the other hand, its lenses should be much lighter because they're half the focal length of 35mm lenses with equivalent coverage.

-Ivan > > Bernie > ..]
 

sclamb

Well-Known Member
Bernie

There are some excellent reviews and s&le images at these locations (although I should mention that I tried the G3 and G5 personally and can vouch for hte colour frining issue being worse in the G5):

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(the fringing is demonstrated here:
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)

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Hope these help. The first link compares the G5 to the Nikon 5400 and the Sony DSC V1.

There is another review that I cannot find now that clearly shows the superior imaging capability of the G3 over the G5. They are after all the same lens, just the sensor has changes.

Hope this helps.

Simon
 

dirk

CI-Founder
Bernard,

yesterday Minolta announced the new Dimage A1 which some very interesting specs. This will cost around 1200 USD and has 5 MP.

But I would wait with your decision at least til August 18th. More announcements will come from other manufacturers


The next 8 weeks will be very hot - not only because of the weather
 
I have been using my Canon G3 with excellent results. Skin tones are fantastic and landscape shots are awesome.

I have printed portrait shots out at A1 with incredible results (HP500PS using photo glossy paper). I can't see the justification for the extra expense for the G5. Unfortunately it is now almost impossible to get a G3 in the UK. If anyone knows of a source of G3s I have friends wanting to buy them.

I was wondering whether there is anything I can do to get the equivalent of a 50mm focal length lens to attach to the G3. Currently I am taking my old SLR out and using that to try to get the correct zoom with the standard G3 lens.

Thanks
 
H

howard

Michael,

It has been a while since Canon released the G5. Since the life span of a digicam seems to be only 6 mo's to 1 year, You may wait until the G6 is released. You can be sure that the new G6, whenever it is released will even better - more MP, better features, better performance and a lower price. I have no inside information regarding Canon -- I am just an observer of the world of digicams.

Good luck in your decision.

Howard
 

mike_dial

New Member
> I was wondering why you say they only have a life span of 6 months to a year? I have a Canon Powershot A40 that is a few years old, and is still going strong! It takes Great pictures, good enough for 8X10 prints. By the way, I joined the forum looking for manuals, and could not seem to access them. Is there a secret? (I found the manual on Google).

Thanks,

Mike
 
H

howard

Mike,

First, I am not sure whether you are referring to market lives or useful lives. Cameras that are not being marketed have useful lives long after the manufacturer ceases production. I still use a Canon EF circa mid 1970's, get great results, and that camera was discontinued over 20 years ago. The 6 months to a year market life of digicams is a perception, not based on actual study of how long manufacturers market particular digicams. Maybe 6 months to a year is too short. How long was the G3 out before it was replaced by the G5? How long was the D60 out before it was replaced by the D10? It seems as if those product life cycles were fairly short. Nikon's life cycles seem be longer the D100, 5400, 5700. Digicams generally seem to have short life cycles compared to their film camera counterparts.

I still feel that the G5 will ultimately be replaced by a new better G6 by mid next year. As I recollect, when the G5 came out, commentators were generally pleased with the camera performance, but some disappointed that that the changes from the G3 were not more dynamic. I think that there is room for a camera like a new G6, with the same sensor as used in D10 and D-Rebel. Why not upgrade the G5 with the Canon 6MP sensor with less noise at higher ISO's and maybe with a maximum ISO OF 1600. Maybe the lens can also be upgraded as well; it may need more resolution with 6MP. It seems as if there would a market for such a camera. I am just guessing what might happen. I am no sage; if I was I would have been more successful in the stock market.

I do not know how long the A40 has been out, but my daughter just bought an A70 (I hope I got the number right). I am very interested to see her pictures. I understand it is a very good camera.

I wish you continued good results with your A40.

Howard
 

griffin

Active Member
> What the preceding message means is that they bring out new models frequently, not that the cameras go bad. According to several reviews , the G3 is perfectly good, but the G5 has some slight color fringing problems. I really liked the G2 I had, but opted to get a EOS 1D for speed.
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
Howard, I think placing the D10 sensor in a G camera would require a much larger lens to cover the increase in sensor size. The G camera would then become almost the size of a Rebel... which already exists in digital format.

Also, after living with and shooting the G5 for some time, I now do not think it was worth the additional money over the G3. I thought so at first, but in retrospect I have altered my opinion on the subject.
 
H

howard

Marc,

We shall see if Canon can overcome the technical difficulties in using the Rebel sensor or something similar in a G6. You may be correct it is not feasable to use the that sensor without increasing the size of the camera. A larger lens will make the camera heavier and larger, both of which would make the camera less appealing. If the price, bulk approaches the size and weight of the Rebel, it would be difficult to compete against the Rebel.

Time will tell what Canon plans for the G series.

Howard
 

matthewm

Member
I think it's important to realize that digital cameras are, in terms of marketing and product developement, computers NOT cameras. Traditionally, camera companies announced new models every 2 years at the Photokina trade show, and models remained in production for years. How long has the EOS 1v been Canon's pro film SLR? Now, new models are being released almost quarterly, and those models are being upgraded or discontinued after only months.

The great advantage to this is that Moore's Law comes in to play for cameras (i.e. they become twice as powerful and half as expensive every 18 months). The D30-D60-10D sequence is a perfect ex&le. The D30 was released with a certain feature set at a certain price, then less than a year later the D-60 is released with twice the resolution at a similar price, and then about 8 months later the 10D comes out with enhanced performance at a lower price. This also presents a downside in that your new camera will drop in price almost constantly after you purchase it, and a few months after you've bought it the manufacturer will introduce a new model with more features and/or a lower price.

This has been happening in the computer industry for years. So, buying a digital camera will be like buying a computer. if you wait for the new model to get cheaper/more powerful you'll be waiting forever, without a camera! The only real option is to find the best price on the camera that meets your needs now and resign yourself to the fact that it will be a couple of hundred dollars less in a few months or the manufacturer will release a better/cheaper model by the time you figure out all the features.

I think it will be interesting to see if other trends of the computer industry cross-over to the photograpy world as well. I already know that my two year-old digital camera has almost no [relative] resale value, much like my 10GB hard drive.
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
Matthew, you are oh so right.

However, as far as an investment, cameras have never been all that great (except for some select items like Leica). I think it will even out when digital cameras truely equal 35mm film in versatility at a reasonable price. Then they can add stuff to it, but it won't really make all that much difference if you are after making photographs.

Rumor has it that Canon will next replace the D10 and boost the performance of the 1D (not 1Ds), to 8 meg @ 8 FPS. If that is true, I will buy the 1D for my second wedding camera... but it will not reduce the "shooting" value of my 1Ds which does the job quite well as it is.
 
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