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G3 wish list

afranklin

Well-Known Member
Thanks for all the great input! One complaint I have with some of the Leica lenses, specifically the Noctilust, is they just don't focus very close. How close can you focus with the 45?

Wouldn't there be a distance limitation of the IR focus assist? 8M is pretty far, like 24 feet...can anyone test this limit?

Regards,

Austin
 
J

jgban

The zoom and the 90mm focus to 1m; the rest (and , specifically, the 45) go to 0.5m.

I tried a little, and I was only able to focus to 5m with focus assist light. I guess this could be one of those situations for manual focus (manual focus to 3-5m, set f:8 and shoot with flash).
 

afranklin

Well-Known Member
Hi Juan,

> The zoom and the 90mm focus to 1m; the rest (and , specifically, the > 45) go to 0.5m.

That's fantastic, I sometimes work very up close, and this is a nice advantage.

> I tried a little, and I was only able to focus to 5m with focus assist > light

That's not too bad...I think it's important to understand the limitations of the camera...as that means more good images, and less disappointment.

Regards,

Austin
 

esko_ppo

Member
This function is really useful,whenever you switch to the manual focus, = it is in the same distance in which you used it before. Mine is in = infinity for low light landscape and street photos.
 

afranklin

Well-Known Member
Have any of you G1/G2 owners used this:

"Contax GA-1 Mount Adapter (To Mount SLR Lenses on the G-Series Cameras)"

??? that sounds quite interesting to me...if I could use my SLR lenses on the G2, using manual focus (how accurate the focus indicator is, I don't know...).

Regards,

Austin
 

afranklin

Well-Known Member
Hi,

Can the G2 be set to AE Lock when the shutter button is depressed half way?

Anyone have the databack? If so, any comment?

Regards,

Austin
 

gjames52

Well-Known Member
Can the G2 be set to AE Lock when the shutter button is depressed half way?

Yes, using custom function #1 set to #1

(how accurate the focus indicator is, I don't know...).

I have compared the distance shown on the auto focus scale and the manual read out and they are consistent. Bear in mind the viewfinder scale for e.g. Shows from infinity to 5 meters, a great deal to interpolate.

The manual indicator and focusing is based on the same as auto focus system. The auto focus distance scale indicates meters, as does the manual read out. The difference is that the manual indicated distance reading is located on the top of the camera instead of the viewfinder.

Regards

Gilbert
 

afranklin

Well-Known Member
Hi Gilbert,

> > Can the G2 be set to AE Lock when the shutter button is depressed half > > way? > > Yes, using custom function #1 set to #1

Excellent, thank you.

> The manual indicator and focusing is based on the same as auto focus > system. The auto focus distance scale indicates meters, as does the > manual read out. The difference is that the manual indicated distance > reading is located on the top of the camera instead of the viewfinder.

Top of the camera? That seems like it's somewhat useless... How does the AF indicator (in the viewfinder) indicate in focus? The AX has arrows and a dot in the middle. It makes the dot solid when you're in focus (and beeps if you want it to), the arrows give the direction you're out of focus. On the AX, it's got a pretty narrow band, in other words, quite accurate.

Speaking of AX, a LOT of the features/functions of the G2 are identical to the AX...which makes me believe they share some of the same components...or at least some of the same electronics. I was surprised that the G2 doesn't provide the actual aperture information anywhere electronically...and for the awesome data back, it simply calculates what the aperture should be...instead of what it actually is. Guess they didn't put encoders in the lenses for the aperture rings...

The G2 seems to be an exceptional camera, with some annoying, not well thought through, design "choices". I wish there was going to be a G3.

Regards,

Austin
 

cle

New Member
Why do you want to do that for ?. I'd rather compose, lock the exposure with the AE Lock button, re-aim the autofocus, keep the shutter button half-way, re-compose then shoot.
 
T

tjc783

> This "discussion" has filled up my email box long enough. Why don't you take it and just email your replies privately to each other. This is like the asinine threads about 'which is better Canon or Nikon?" Go private with your dispute. Tom
 

afranklin

Well-Known Member
Hi Cuong,

> Why do you want to do that for ?. I'd rather compose, lock the > exposure with the AE Lock button, re-aim the autofocus, keep the > shutter button half-way, re-compose then shoot.

I prefer to lock the exposure with the shutter release, and lock the focus with the focus lock button on the back. If you forget and leave the exposure lock locked, you can ruin quite a few shots... My method works perfectly for me on my AX, so I'd prefer to be consistent and do it this way with the G2.

Regards,

Austin
 

saspencr

Well-Known Member
I wondered who uses the focus lock on the back and what advantage it might have. Personally, I find it less natural than pushing the lever...just personal preference. Are there other reasons that it would be advantageous to use the focus lock on the back? Scott
 

afranklin

Well-Known Member
Hi Scott,

> I wondered who uses the focus lock on the back and what advantage it > might have. Personally, I find it less natural than pushing the > lever...just personal preference. Are there other reasons that it > would be advantageous to use the focus lock on the back? Scott

I set AE lock to be shutter button half way, which still, BTW, does focus lock as well as AE lock. Why I like having the AE lock on the shutter button, and the ability to do focus lock on the back is so I can focus on one thing, lock it, expose on another, lock it, then recompose and shoot...and that, for me, gives me optimal control of the image. Though, I really wish it had a spot meter...but at least the very center is the area of highest sensitivity.

Regards,

Austin
 

saspencr

Well-Known Member
Austin, I'll have to think about your technique and whether it would be useful to me. Regarding the weight centered metering, I guess only experience will be adequate in helping to understand when the meter might still be fooled when the photographer has the center pointed on the equivalent of a grey card. Scott
 

salmori

New Member
My dreamed G3:
- bathroom: when I´m taking photos in the desert I need some personal care.
- a chair: long time stand up it´s over.
- an oven: a good breakfast it´s the best way to take good photos...

Have the perfect camera it´s not possible, but this is part of our hobbie. We like to have different cameras, lenses, tripods, cases...
Who wants to have a 21-600 mm f1,4?? I like to change the lens, go shopping, etc.
 
R

rickd

I do some of my best thinking while my brain is oxygen-starved. Or not, you be the judge.

I was snowshoeing in the high country yesterday, toting my trusty G2 w/ 21 and 90 and was thinking about what frustrates me with the manual focus, which is the lack of ease with which to set the hyperfocal distance.

Why not a hyperfocal distance command button? You'd select an f-stop via a selector dial, telling tell the G (let's call this a G2-B) which aperture you'd sent. The camera, of course, already knows what lens is mounted and if you're using the zoom, it also knows what focal length is set. The camera would use the input to rack the lens to the correct focus position.

I'd find this a boon for shooting scenics, particularly in situations that are a challenge to the auto focus (snow, to use a convenient ex&le).

By extension, if the user selected an f-stop and a focus distance, the camera could present DOF data. The values could be presented on the LCD screen or in the viewfinder.

A point of contention could be what circle of confusion value they'd use. I suppose even this could be a user preference.

Any reason why this *wouldn't* work? Has Canon or Nikon already buried a similar feature into one of their fabulously complicated system camera bodies?

--Rick
 

chevrol

New Member
I totally agree with you Rick, this feature would be great.
But setting the aperture first on the lens then on the body would be something as infuriating as using the second polarizer trick on rangefinders...
So in my point of view, such a feature can only be enjoyable if the body is able to know by itself the aperture set on the lens.
In that case, this new position on the command dial would make for a great feature. For the CoC , it could be derived automatically from the sensitivity of the film, which is closely correlated to the ISO rating...

Apart from that, I think my brother told me that his Canon EOS fantastic technology marvelous plastic camera had a feature maximizing the depth of view, which amounts to pretty much the same thing when the focus is infinity. Patent protected ? :)

By the way, this is my first post, but I've been enjoying the read for a while.
I own a G2+45 and really get my kick out of it, even if the digital freaks tend to think I'm a craze.
Thanks for all the good opinions, advices, etc. that this forum contains.

Eric C.
 
R

rickd

Great idea about auto-magically matching the CoC to the film Eric! I hearby agree to share my royalties from Contax with you once they've added the feature.

I also agree that setting a dial on the body isn't the simplest method, but because the lenses don't communicate the f-stop to the body, it's the only scheme I can come up with.

Unless these mysterious extra contacts on the lenses really *are* for communicating aperture.

--Rick
 
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