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Hit & Miss

Steaphany

Well-Known Member
Here we are, in the 21st century. Vehicle performance being optimized by computer control systems, design engineers pressured to extract every bit of energy from the fuel, and where does that fuel come from - oil wells with pump jacks powered by 100 year old stationary engines.

Here, in North Central Texas, many oil well pump jacks are powered by electric motors, while a few demonstrate the engineering of times long past. Stationary hit and miss engines, like the one pictured here, reliably run, day or night, hot or cold, year round just as they have been for over a life time.

I just got done processing this. Photographed with my Sigma SD14 through my Orion 1250mm f/13.9 ( 90mm Ø ) Maksutov Cassegrain at f/13.9, 1/200th, ISO 400. The angle of view was too small to capture the whole engine in one exposure. This is the result of a mosaic comprising 9 exposures. It took a bit to make sure the motion blur of the running engine didn't ruin the final image.

SDIM0091-SDIM0103IVu.jpg
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Even with the vibration sensitivity, contrast issues, and vignetting inherent with a Maksutov Cassegrain, this turned out well.
 

tc95

Well-Known Member
Very nice shot...that is so true.....all the modern things...and you still see a 100 year old design still running....

Thanks for showing us...and for showing us the results of the stacking..

Tony C.
 

Bustoner

Well-Known Member
Wow Steaphany, perfect composition!!!
many photos for finding same wheel ray positions, very good work!!

I'm not practical at all with Telescopes, I wanna ask you how far you was?
And how you connect your SD14 on it? ....need an adapter...??
 

Steaphany

Well-Known Member
I'm not good at judging distances so I feel it was between 100 and 200 feet, or 30 to 60 meters.

Just as any SLR is connected to a telescope, I have a T-mount to Sigma SA adapter. I brought this up in other discussions here and once posted the URL where it can be purchased on ebay.
 
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