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Need reliable source for lens repair

gunteach

Well-Known Member
Hello all...

Well, it went like this. I bought a second-hand G1 body as a spare, it came with a 45/2 Planar. I had two now, so I sold one very quickly, and it's gone. The other one immediately began acting up, making a very loud grinding sound on attempts to focus it, inability to lock focus, and not allowing either of two G1 bodies to fire with this lens attached. Neither body has a problem with any other G lens however. The glass and diaphragm on this lens appear flawless.

Two questions. First, is there a reliable place in the U.S. preferably where I can get this lens repaired, or better to pitch it and buy another on e-bay? Second, I see where a seller on e-bay has a new 45/2 "outer core" which as I understand it is basically the whole lens EXCEPT the glass and aperature (which seem good on my lens) which he has left over from a conversion project. For anyone familiar with the design and function of these lenses, are these the parts I would need to re-build my lens? Could a more or less competent repair technician handle this, or is it a specialist job?

Any advice or information anyone here could provide would be much appreciated. By the way, the listing number on the parts on e-bay is 7572070287.

Thanks,

Tom
 

wang

Well-Known Member


In this photo, you are looking at the G45 without the inner core and filter ring. You can see the outer core in black inside the titanium case. You can see the spiral threads between the case and the outer core. The dial with the copper bolts is part of the aperture ring and attach itself to the aperture. The outer core moves forwards and backwards if you turn the screw at the G mount. You can also see some holes for the screwing. These screws holds the inner core, outer core and filter ring together.
 

wang

Well-Known Member


The photo showed the inner core in a more anterior position than the previous one. The outer core has covered the spiral thread so that it is no longer visible. You can see the indentations for the metal bearing when you move the aperture ring. You can also see the filter ring. The only non-movable structures holding the inner core in place are the four screws in front.
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
Looks pretty sharp. But it shows blown highlights and hard tonal edging which is typical of smaller sensor digital cameras.
 

gunteach

Well-Known Member
Wang,

Thanks for the pictures. Tell me, what is involved in re-inserting the inner core in the outer core and re-assembling the lens?

Tom
 

wang

Well-Known Member
Hi Tom,

I am no expert in this, as you know, my lens was disassembled by Mr Miyasaki.

As you see from the photos, separating the inner and outer core involved first, unscrewing four of the screws and unscrewing the inner core from the filter ring. It would be easier if you can see the actual thing, just wait.

Marc, I would think those features described by you were problems of the lighting rather than the camera's faults. In order to expose correctly the inner surface of the component, I have to overexpose outside.

Joseph
 

jsmisc

Well-Known Member
I think the new Nikon uses an APS size sensor too but I haven't seen any reviews for it yet. Nikons generally use a smaller sensor and seem to get good reviews.
 
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