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Not thrilled with my 10D

mdp613

New Member
I upgraded to a 10D in few months ago after being impressed with the images a G3 produced. Though the SLR has given me so much more control over the shot settings, I have been very disappointed with the focus of the pictures. I have sent the camera back to the factory for re-evalutation, but many of the pictures I take still tend to be of focus. About one in ten come out nice. Is this normal? I was ashamed of the pictures taken at my daughter's graduation and when on a recent trip to Montauk, NY, my brother in law's Sony produced many more 'focused' shots then my 10D; both were using auto settings. I have taken 100's of pictures now. Yes, some percentage can be attributed to operator error, however, when I simply place the camera in Auto mode, such as portrait, I can rest assured that my subject's face (the focal point) will be a bit blurred. (The objects behind the subject tend to be in better focus). Is anyone else experiencing the same problem? Do I need to send the camera back to Canon again? Any sugestions? Is there someone else in Canon, besides the factory repair center, I can talk to about this problem? I would like to invest in a set of L series lenses, however I can not justify buying them at this time. Unless of course the lens is the basis of my problem.

Thank you, Michael Pollum
 
H

howard

Michael,

I sure hope someone can solve your problem as I was considering getting a 10D. It will be interesting to see if other users have had similar problem. Have you posted this same message on photo.net as I think they have a Canon thread as well.

Good luck.

Howard
 

molley

Well-Known Member
There is something in the 10D setup that mentions 7 focus points. A review I was reading said that the user had set his at "Dead Centre" . Could this be at the root of your problems .
Stuart
 

fotografz

Well-Known Member
Both my photo partner and I use 10Ds for weddings and have experienced zero focusing problems.

Just curious, but what would dead center focusing have to do with the out of focus situation?
 

mdp613

New Member
Marc A. Williams (and others).... thank you for your reply to my post at CanonInfo.com .... I have been having difficulty with sharp focused images ... this may not be true with all 10D's however, for ex&le, if I take a picture of a person's face and have the camera focus on it, when the picture is downloaded from the camera, the face, which was to be the main point of focus, is out of focus. I have varied the apperature to adjust the focal length, I have used the preset auto settings, manual settings, varied the autofocus not be on dead center, etc. etc. etc. ... I use a Canon EF 28-90mm f/4-5.6 II USM lens. It would be nice to meet someone in my area (Southern NJ, Southeast PA)that has a Canon 10D, in order to compare performance the cameras.
 

molley

Well-Known Member
If the remark about "dead centre focussing" is intended for me as I raised it altho' it is not clear who it is intended for -I dd not say it DID have anything to do with the OP's problem. I merely asked if it could be -I dont know how the 10D works in this respect Stuart
 

pops

Active Member
Is the 10D with the zoom lens perhaps a little bulky? Try to reshoot with a tripod to test for too much coffee. If that's it maybe you just need to work on your grip of the camera. Lets eliminate the simplest possibilities first before sending the camera back to be checked.
Let us know if you're still out of focus.
Good Luck

Ken
 

molley

Well-Known Member
>But that ( camera shake ) would show up with all the picture being blurry >rather than just a part of it as in "out of focus"

Stuart

>
 

esojo

Member
I purchased an EOS 10D which came with the latest software version installed, so I assume it is of very recent manufacture and I have no focusing problems.
 

hitmebak

New Member
Michael, I'm not sure if you've tried this or not. I ran across this info while reading the review of the 10D on dpreview.com site...

Sharpness adjustment
The EOS-10D's default sharpening level is very conservative, certainly compared to other digital SLR's. This keeps visible noise down and provides better control for post-processing sharpening. If you prefer your images a little sharper out of the camera the +2 setting would probably be the best choice, +1 makes very little difference. This is a good ex&le of a parameter which needs even more levels of adjustment. It's probably also worth noting that EOS-10D images appear to respond very well to 'unsharp mask' post-processing.

Hitmebak
 

t90

New Member
Michael...I'm a 25 year plus user of Canon SLR's. I personally don't believe a 10D has the ju-ju to make me jump from conventional film to digital...that will be at least one or two more generations down the road. Still I like mysterys like your reported focus problem. If I were you I'd think about putting your camera on a tripod with a fast f2 or so lens on it. I'd line up, in a staggered line, about 8 bright, easy to focus items. Each item (use soup cans with readable labels or something) would be about a foot behind and off side of the previous. I'd take an exposure of each item with the lens wide open, first with manual focus then with autofocus. Tell us what you find.
 

hitmebak

New Member
Michael, one other thing to try would be to visit the shop that sold you your 10D and see if they'll let you take a few shots using a couple of their high end lenses. Not necessarily the L series but say maybe the 100mm f/2 or the 85mm f/1.8.... A good reasonable zoom to try would be the 70-200mm f/4 L.... Just another suggestion...

Hitmebak
 
G

geofflukins

The most obvious thing I can think of is that you have the focus setting at M instead of AF as all of the photos I have taken with the 10D have been exceptionally sharp. What lens are you using?
 

mdp613

New Member
Alan... this is not the case.... I have used M and AF settings. I use a Canon EF 28-90mm f/4-5.6 II USM lens.

Jim V. ... I will try your suggestion.

Hitmebak ... The branch of a particular camera shop in my area, from which I purchased the camera, does not carry higher end lens; but if I have too I will travel the distance to one of the other branches that does and try a few shots with one.

Thank you ALL! I will let you know of the out come.
 
A

allenbell

Hi
thought you might like to know that my 10D bought in the UK seems to have the same focus (or lack of it) problem. I have used it extensively for the last four weeks for professional shoots and the focus is a real headache, whether in Manual, Auto, or on a tripod.

Fortunatley the images were captured for photoshop manipulation - so at least I can use the soft images as a design feature.

However I need to get this sorted ASAP - I though it was just me using the camera incorrectly until I read this group. I will take this issue to Canon UK to see what excuse they can come up with.

Cheers
 

sclamb

Well-Known Member
I finally went to the shop to get a 10D. Tried one and the AF was off, manual focus spot on. Tried a second, same problem. Third, same again. Walked out. Phoned Canon. They said they have not heard of any focus problems with 10D. Buying Nikon now.
 

rnot

New Member
Michael, You said you were using program mode. I wonder if your shutter is dropping below 1/60. If this is the case, it would make your pics out of focus. You might take a few shots under different lighting conditions and watch your meter. See if it drops below 1/60.
 

molley

Well-Known Member
>The shutter speed does NOT make pics out of foocus .It may cause camera >shake which will blur the pics but that is a different effect .

Stuart
 
R

roblumba

Actually, both Stuart and Todd are a little off mark. Shutter speed does not make pics out of focus and it does not cause camera shake either. The real cause is the person with the camera. If the camera is on a tripod, then it is not moving and very stable. If the person is holding it extremely still, like in those movies when the professional sniper has the scope on a subject, then this is also good.
Low shutter speed just means that it becomes extremely important that the camera is not moving.
I have been consisitently amazed at my father's ability to take 1 second shots that come out sharp on low ISO slide film.
I try to take some extra time to slow my breath and feel the stable position of the camera on the subject before pressing the button. For those of you that have experience with guns and target practice, it will probably be much easier.
If I recall correctly, the press of the shutter button should be at the pause in your breathing. At the most relaxed state.
 
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