Recommended closeup lens Canon or Nikon for 70200

G

Guest

I occasionally wish my lens would focus a little closer. I currently have the N1 with 24-85 and 70-200 lenses; they are great but not suitable for close-ups of flowers or larger insects. The Contax macro lens may be great but it is way to expensive for my budget and needs. I also think the extension tubes for the N lenses are ridiculously priced. So, I was thinking about the Nikon "T" or Canon 500 D achromat close up lenses and combine with my N70-200. Question is, can I use 67-to-62 step down ring with 62 mm Nikon close up without vignetting wide open, or should I go for 67-to-72 step up ring with 72 mm Canon 500 D to avoid vignetting? Anyone tried similar set-up? All info greatly appreciated.
 
G

Guest

>Otola,

I have used the Canon CU500T on a Contax 80-200/4MM lens with excellent results. I used a 55-58mm reducer to do so. I cannot think why you might have problems doing the same with a later series lens with the later, better D-series CU adaptors. After all, the filters simply bring the infinity focusing distance back to whatever distance their designation relates to, ie CU500 = 500mm, 250 = 250mm etc. John Shaw gives a lengthy dissertation about the use of these types of filters in his book 'Close-ups in Nature' and it is well worth a read, as is the whole book on the subject of macro work.

My inclination would always be to step down a larger filter rather than stepping up a smaller one for the very reason you mention, vignetting. The only prohibition against this approach would be the cost of the larger filters. I have a 72mm CU500D that I was lucky to find second hand. A new one is about $300AUS.

Regards,

Gary Brook
 
G

Guest

Gary - thanks for the info. What sort of magnification ranges do you get with and without your close-up lens? My 70-200 normally focuses from infinity to 1 meter at every zoom setting, I believe, and then gets about 1:6 or close thereoff. If the 500D cuts this in half to about 50 cm, does that mean magnification will be 1:3?

Cheers
 
G

Guest

> Otola,

the short answer is yes, 1:3 on your lens. If you use the 58mm CU250D you would get 1:1.5 without converters, extension tubes or any light loss. That is one of the advantages of the filters, as long as they are of high quality, and most of the name brands are, then there is no light loss for the extra magnification. With extension tubes and teleconverters you lose light and therefore shutter speed, always a ctitical issue with macro work.

Gary
 
Top