SD14 damage resistance

skyrk

Member
How careful should I be with my cameras? I have got a few drops of rain on them on some occations, never dropped them to the ground or something like that. I'm usually very careful with the photo equipment. Maybe I don't need to be that careful. It would be nice to take photos when it is raining outside.

It would be interesting to hear from others here if you have used your cameras in extreme situations and what happened to them. Perhaps you got water on them or dropped them a few meters. Perhaps some other extreme situation: dust/heat/cold/?...

- Staffan
 

rpo83

Member
Hi Staffan,

I can't tell you about your SD14, but i have used my SD10 in torrential rain at a motorsport meeting, the body and lens got soaked, i kept drying it ASAP and have had no problems.

I have ordered some rain covers for my new SD14 when it arrives, that were advertised on eBay:

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For the price, they are worth a try.

Cheers

Steve
 

foveonfan

Well-Known Member
Hello, Staffan!

Always pays to err on the side of caution. What I do when having to venture into the land of liquid sunshine :) , is to unpack an always carried plastic bag made of heavy plastic (I carry 2 of these) that is about one third larger than my largest lens, (50 - 500mm) and camera together. The bottom of this bag has been removed (cut open) and this is slipped over the assembled lens and camera with the front opening secured to the outside of the lens hood with a sturdy, broad elastic band.

Sincere regards, Jim Roelofs.

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skyrk

Member
Thanks for the replies!

rpo83:

How long did you continue shooting after the body and lens was exposed to the water?

The ebay raincovers might be just what I need, I also ordered some now. I'll write in this thread when I've tried them.
--

foveonfan:

It is good to be cautious, but I don't want to be overcautious if it restrains me from taking better pictures.

I've used to take plastic bags with me when out, in case of rain. But just to protect the equipment, not continue shooting. I will try the plastic bag method you describe, perhaps with some modifications.
--

I haven't tried continuing using the equipment in heavy rain yet, but I've used it at low temperatures during the winter. Down to -20 °C or so. The camera locks up more often, and the battery drains twice as fast. There's probably no risk for any permanent damage by cold, but I expected it to work better than it does.

- Staffan
 

rpo83

Member
Hi Staffan,

I was just caught out in a short downpour. Both the Camera and lens got totally soaked. One of my biggest concerns was about condensation, more so than the body getting wet, i didn't put the camera back in it's case, i got a towel and thoroughly dried it. I was only caught out for about 3 or 4 minutes. That night i left the camera on a table so it could air out, then shot with it the next day.

I usually work very hard at looking after my gear, but on that day, the elements conspired against me.

Here is a pic of the rain!



This was a day when i was ready to jump to Canon, none of the images were sharp, the AF and the write speed was pitiful.

I now have renewed enthusiasm, all i need to do is get a good telephoto Leitz lens or two now...

Cheers

Steve
 

iMac

Active Member
Hello, Staffan!

Always pays to err on the side of caution. What I do when having to venture into the land of liquid sunshine :) , is to unpack an always carried plastic bag made of heavy plastic (I carry 2 of these) that is about one third larger than my largest lens, (50 - 500mm) and camera together. The bottom of this bag has been removed (cut open) and this is slipped over the assembled lens and camera with the front opening secured to the outside of the lens hood with a sturdy, broad elastic band.

Sincere regards, Jim Roelofs.

Please visit my humble gallery @
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Hi,

Inside my shoulder bag I pack each of my SD14's (one with f/2.8 18-50, one with 70-300 APO Telephoto) each in an separate insulated plastic cool bag. As used for packing one's lunch.
Internal dimensions are width 4.5" x depth 6.5" x height 9.0".
The width matches the SD14's height when fitted with the Manfrotto quick release.

These cool bags are waterproof and with the insulation, provide good protection for cameras and lenses.

Cool bags make good camera bags, good for disguising your photo gear when in dodgy places! It sometimes does not pay to advertise your expensive gear!

Regards,

iMac
 

toisondor

Well-Known Member
Does anyone have experience with exposure to blowing sand?

Some of the areas I like to hike and shoot photos are notorious for the sand. I picked up a couple of the plastic rain sleeves as well, but I plan to use them in the desert.

Jesse
 
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