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User comments btil June 2003

P

paulzt

Sinds july i own a cp 5700 and have a 2 problems with it. I don't know if this is a operator error or a camera error.
1 st: 50% of my indoor, dim light pictures are out of focus. Outdoor pictures are most of the time oke. In focus en very goed of colour. I tried al kind of combinations in the setup menu and different circumstances but the result is more or less the same.
2nd: Indoor flash pictures (internal flash) are fot 90% overexposed. This is easy to correct in photo shop, but never the less.....
I have red a lot of forums, but the out of focus problem i never encouter. So i though it must be a camera fault. I send it to Nikon and got it back with the notice that noting was wrong with it.
I had a Nikon 6006 (601) fot over 12 yrs and had never (except in bad conditions) pictures out of focus (I have a staddy hand).
Does anyone has a clou????
8141.jpg
 
F

florijan

Read my question April-16-2003 and answer on it. I had the some problems.
You can use the speedlight option in camera menu (+, -) for correct the overexpose.

Unsharp picture ?

You can take a picture with shorter exp. time then 1/125 sec without of speedlight !?

If you take a picture with 2/3 to max ZOOM, you haven't a staddy hand ....

Tell as more about shooting data.
 
P

paulzt

The picture shown in the forum : iso 200; speed 1/125; app 3.7 ; normal exposure program. When the photo's taken with interal flash and over exposed the speed is alway 1/60 and app. 2.8 to 4.0. By the way, I have a staddy hand, but when the speed is 1/4 it's not likely to have a sharp picture, I know that but the picture shown has other settings and isn't in focus. The camera has troubble to get in focus. The green light keeps blinking, so the camera knows it is not in focus but is not able to set it right!! Paul.
 
P

paulzt

>Do you have any experiance with pictures out of focus. In dim light (indoor) 50 % of the foto's are out of focus. Paul
 
F

f90x

>I don't have any experience with this camera, but when you say it is in dim light then I guess that it is simply too dark for the AF to function. > groetjes, Claus
 
P

paulzt

> That's an open door. Offcourse I 've checked the light. But in a livingroom with normal artificial light, my nikon 601 and my friends fuij602 has no problems at all. If i take 5 times the same picture (light, speed, app etc.) 3 are out of focus. Paul.
 
F

f90x

>I don't know if you have an EV curve available for that camera. If so you could look up the value of your aperture shutter speed combination and see if the AF can handle it. > A workaround would be to have a small flash light (flash light as in zak l&) to illuminate your subject for focusing and turn it of for the actual shot, if you can lock AF.
 

billydan50

New Member
I've ben using my 5700 for about 9 months and on occasion my viewfinder is about half way filled with a vertical light flash. Any ideas or suggestions?
 

dfc

New Member
I've just got a SpeedLight SB-80DX flashgun for my CP5700. Does anyone know how this (used off-camera) will interact with the built-in flashgun? Will the latter simply lighten the shadows without requiring exposure compensation?
 

arnettmedia

New Member
Whenever I try to use the zoom on the 5700, I notice a clicking sound inside...sounds very much like mice scurrying inside... Is this normal???

Thanks!

Will
 
Re: 5700 mice scurrying around,
There seems to be a buzzing sound when zooming, but I personally think it's normal. If the sound is unusually loud, I would suggest contacting Nikon for their analysis,
Good luck
Rollo
 
P

paulzt

Problems with auto focus in dimmed light.
In a room with only a few lights on, the camera have lots of problems to let the autofocus work correctly.
My F601 have in the same room no problems at all.
Have anyone else this problem???
 

dcaridade

Member
Indoor pictures too dark.

I just bought a Coolpix 5700 and I can't figure out how to make my indoor pictures brighter without using the flash. Can anyone give me any input on this?

Thanks in advance,

Dan
 

lnbolch

Well-Known Member
Use the Exposure Compensation to raise the exposure to your taste.

Inside, it is wise to shoot on aperture priorty with an f-stop as close as possible to f-2.8 (this varies with zoom).

Shoot at ISO400 or ISO800.

Notes on low light photography:

Using aperture priority, you use the widest possible aperture which lets the shutter speed float, ensuring you have the highest possible shutter speed as the light changes.

You will get a higher level of noise at ISO400 and ISO800, but you will also get pictures! I will take a picture with a bit of grain or noise any day over no usable picture at all.

If the shutter speed drops below 1/15th of a second, it will be wise to turn Noise Reduction on, or there will be brightly coloured pixels that will show up in the images. This is normal, and NR removes them.

For night time photography, off a tripod, exposures up to five minutes are practical with extremely good results using NR.

If you are shooting hand-held at low shutter speeds, BSS (Best Shot Selector) is a great help in getting sharp pictures. It shoots up to 10 shots and compares them, keeping only the sharpest one. It also helps to shoot from you lap, arm of a chair, table or whatever you can use to steady the camera when shooting with ambient light.

Stay as wide-angle as is practical. Instead of zooming, get closer. Long lenses are very difficult to focus under low light conditions, and hand holding exacerbates the problem. The camera needs something contrasty to focus on, and a shaking camera with a long lens makes focusing nearly impossible.

Auto white balance works great outside, but is pretty much useless otherwise. You will see in the manual that there are seven settings for Incandescent lights, which you get by turning the knob. A setting of +2 or +3 works well with household bulbs, while 0 works well with photofloods. If you have mixed lighting, take a manual reading off any neutral coloured object. A Kodak grey card is calibrated and reliable, but a piece of white paper will get you close as well.

I have some s&les of low light photography done with the sister camera the CP5000, with information on how they were shot and processed at
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The histogram is your best friend, and the greatest light meter ever invented. I use it constantly and get great, consistent exposures. There is an introduction to it
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Everything that applies to the CP5000 also applies to the CP5700. They use identical engines, with the only difference being that one is optimized for wide-angle and general photography, and the other is optimized for telephotography, but can also be used for some general photography. Both cameras work superbly in low light as you can see from the pictures. It does take some practice and skill, but with the instant replay function of the camera, you can learn quickly with the feedback it gives you.

larry! ICQ 76620504
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arthur

Member
I have a 5700 and got a wide Converter WC-E80. I need to take indoor shots of house rooms and all are out of focus. I tried the manual focus wheel, but no luck. Any suggestions appreciated.
 

arthur

Member
I'll answer my own question. Get a tripod!! Wow, what a difference. I never thought I was that shakey. Also takes care of the dim light problem. I'm getting good interior shots now.
 
P

paulzt

Art,

I had a 5700 for almost a year now. I slamed the bloody thing almost 3 times into the ground, cursed it to hell and sold it for a 1/3 of the price. Man, what a terrible thing. I have used a SLR (6006 F601) for over 12 years, the 5700 is than really a degrade. Very slow, focus problems, to many menu options. Specially the focus. Indoor shots are 50% out of focus. You used a tripod. But when shooting family happenings not very convenient and not expected of a Nikon with this price tag.
But when every things fits in its place, the shots are really wonderfull. Good of colour, sharpness etc. Also the compact design was a argument to buy that thing.
I use now my 6006 again and looking for a DSLR. The D70 is first in order, but did not decide yet.

Paul.
 

arthur

Member
Paul - I see your point. I even purchased an external speedlight and can't get it working.

Larry Bolch mentioned using a histogram for light meter. I don't see it in my 5700.
 

lnbolch

Well-Known Member
The histogram is on page 3 of your review screens.

To use it, shoot a test shot, and switch to review. Turn the knob until the screen shows up, turning either way will get you there.

You will see a thumbnail of the image, and any parts that are blown out or in danger of blowing out will be flashing. There is also a graph of where the lightness values are placed between zero on the left and 255 on the right.

A blown out highlight is only critical if it carries important information, which is often overlooked when the topic is discussed. Specular reflections, actual light sources and so on SHOULD be 255,255,255. If there are light sources in the image or specular reflections off glass, paint or chrome, they will be flashing and that is fine. Skin tones should rarely be flashing.

I have an introduction to the histogram and how to read it at
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It is without doubt the best lightmeter ever invented - this from a boy who cut his teeth on a Weston Master lightmeter and Ansel Adams' Zone System.

Auto exposure is not easy to use unless you have a complete understanding of it. To blindly trust it, means a lot of terrible exposures. It seeks an average of all the light coming in the lens, with a bias of protecting highlights. If a bright light source is in the image area, it will dominate the reading, depressing all other values. It has no idea on its own what it is reading, and the photographer MUST supply the intelligence.

The CP5x00 cameras have several choices in metering to match the shooting environment. Most situations are well handled by the matrix metering which is the default. However, one should review the other types in the manual and possibly even carry a hand-held spot-meter.

The camera has the tools, but the shooter has the brains, These are very complex and sophisticated devices for image capture. They are anything but point-and-shoots.

Even for a long time pro that has shot just about ever type of film camera, they have a daunting learning curve. The reward of learning the camera thoroughly, is that great exposures can be made under the most extreme conditions. They are as awesome once learned, as they are daunting during the beginning of the learning process. Once these cameras are mastered, completely consistent and excellent results can be expected. See:
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larry!
ICQ 76620504
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J

jenb

I just purchased a 5700 and also a sb50 flash. I am planning on using it at a wedding reception within the next two weeks and was looking for some advice on the user settings. It will be indoors and probally low lighting.
 
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