Which monitor for critical use CRT or TFT

G

Guest

I would like to buy a new monitor. In future I might use it for some critical color adjustments of scanned slides in photoshop elements.

Which monitor to buy?
What are the pros and cons of a CRT and TFT monitor for critical color adjustments?

Thanks,
Melv.
 
G

Guest

Hi Melv,

For one thing, the flat panel screens do not "flicker" as regular picture tube type monitors do. They are dead still, which is easier on the eyes. This becomes readily apparent if you point a video camera at each, you will not be able to see the image from a regular monitor, but the flat panel will be solidly visible. Also, I understand there is non of the radiation danger factor as there is with regular monitors, along with much less power consumption and generated heat.

As to brands, while I was browsing around in the local Best Buy electronics chain store with my son (see bestbuy.com) we couldn't help but notice the absolute pristine clarity and full, rich colors of the Samsung 17" Syncmaster flat panel monitor, model 171-(1280 x 1024 resolution).

At first glance, I thought it was merely a high-quality color photo pasted over the panel for simulated effect, but then (to my surprise) I noticed the mouse arrow actually moving on the panel as my son ran his finger across the Sony Vaio touch pad to which it was connected (displaying one of Sony's wallpaper backgrounds).

I am normally a Sony fan, not a dedicated Samsung advocate -- and I'm sure there are those who might disagree -- but I have noticed of late their high-quality standards being reflected in their product lines, as well as their three-year long parts and labor warranties.

Also, I don't know who the actual manufacturer is, but have you noticed the new MAC flat panel screens lately? Absolutely breath-taking image quality -- with a very high price to match They come in ultra-large sizes as well.

Ron Myers
San Diego, California

Samsung SyncMaster 17" and 19" TFT Flat-Panel Monitors
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!


Samsung Electronics TFT-LCD Monitors
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
 
G

Guest

Melv,

If you have a big budget and little work space go with the flat panel. BUT as my photoshop instructor said, after a few years you won't be able to recalibrate your monitor as well as when it's new and you'll end up throwing it away in the end. Technology changes so fast these days. I just bought a La Cie 19" CRT for $400 that is great. A 21" is only $600. Many graphic houses use these as they are designed for graphics, complete with hood to protect against stray light. I get very accurate color in relation to my prints. Why pay more?

Hope it helps.

Guy
 
G

Guest

Guy,

With all due respect to your Photoshop instructor, he may be great with Photoshop, but is likely not pre-cognizant, can't see the future, and is probably not a technical research expert. I (for one) don't necessarily buy into this type of philosophy. Also, with the advance of technology and resultant products, often old requirements, challenges, or concerns are completely bypassed.

Sometime older is better, but not always. How many times does new technology come out and the doom-sayers line up for an audience. For ex&le, like when the motor car first came out over one-hundred years ago now, some of the respected "experts" of the day declared that man was not designed to go that fast, and who could tell what would happen if they did.

BTW, I use a digital 21-inch Silicon Graphics CRT monitor -- made by Mitsubishi, with their black screen technology. A great high-end monitor. However, when the right flat screen monitor comes across my path, my SG is going to be history. You could heat a small house with the heat it puts off. (I turn it off every time I can, instead of letting it go into sleep mode.)

Ron Myers
San Diego, California
 
G

Guest

> >With all due respect to your Photoshop instructor, he may be great > >with Photoshop, but is likely not pre-cognizant, can't see the future, > >and is probably not a technical research expert. I (for one) don't > >necessarily buy into this type of philosophy. Also, with the advance > >of technology and resultant products, often old requirements, > >challenges, or concerns are completely bypassed.

I think you misunderstand what the Photoshop instructor was saying. The way I read it, the instructor wasn't making predictions about technology and LCD displays in general, but was pointing out that an _individual_ LCD display has a finite life for critical work and will eventually become useless, because current LCD display cannot be recalibrated like a CRT as they age and the colors shift.

I'm very curious about the OLED (organic light-emitting diode) technology; this will allow for extremely thin and very bright screens with no backlighting - current LCD screens need a light source behind the screen. We'll be seeing OLEDs first on very small color screens for things like cell phones.

- Paul
 
G

Guest

Dear Paul and Guy,

Ron Myers wrote
<<<
With all due respect to your Photoshop instructor, he may be great with Photoshop, but is likely not pre-cognizant, can't see the future, and is probably not a technical research expert. ... Also, with the advance of technology and resultant products, often old requirements, challenges, or concerns are completely bypassed.
>>>

Paul Schliesser wrote -1
<<
I think you misunderstand what the Photoshop instructor was saying. The way I read it, the instructor wasn't making predictions about technology and LCD displays in general, but
was pointing out that an _individual_ LCD display has a finite life for critical work and will eventually become useless, because current LCD display cannot be recalibrated like a CRT
as they age and the colors shift.

Dear Paul and Guy,

Been thinking about your response, Paul, to my response about Guy's mention of his Photoshop instructor, TFT technology vs CRT recalibration ability, old versus new, etc., etc. First of all, my apologies if it sounded like I was cruisin' for an argument, which I really wasn't. And maybe I got a bit carried away in my response. (Emails and list exchanges are hard to gauge one's meaning and tenor of thought.)

Perhaps I did misunderstand; however, my thoughts were not directed at the individual fine points or nuts & bolts issues of recalibration -- like on a good CRT, or one product model over another. It was more general in nature, concerning what I said, that many times new product technology R&D often eclipses and leaves old problems and/or concerns in the dust.


Paul Schliesser wrote -2
<<
I'm very curious about the OLED (organic light-emitting diode) technology; this will allow for extremely thin and very bright screens with no back-lighting - current LCD screens need a
light source behind the screen. We'll be seeing OLEDs first on very small color screens for things like cell phones.
>>

By the way, this new OLED (organic light-emitting diode) technology sounds very interesting. Tell me more, if you or anyone else can. I've only heard snatches, bits and pieces.

Best Regards,

Ron Myers
San Diego
 
Top