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Why Canon at all

dirk

CI-Founder
Hi,

I would like to know why you have choosen Canon over Nikon, Minolta etc. Is it the Speed of the AF, price/performance ratio etc.?

I do not want to start a Canon vs. Nikon vs. Minolta battle. I would be more interested in your general thoughts for your decision and why you picked Canon model "A" over Canon model "B"...

Dirk
 
G

Guest

I have choosen the EOS1N and EOS1V due to the image stabilizier lenses and then due to the handling and rain water proof design.

Wolfgang
 
G

Guest

Started with the F-1 24+ years ago. Like the looks, feel, build, and image quality from Canon lenses.
This past November bought the RebelG to get into the EOS system, a bit of automation. The 28-135 IS lens is proving to be very sharp-excellent. With it's limits, still enjoy this camera.
G-3 on order since this past Monday. Digital throws us a curve ball-intriguing.
No more buying-going broke.

kowen
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G

Guest

I recently (early February) purchased an Elan 7 with a 50 1.8 II. I decided on Canon (not snubbing any other brand) because my brother-in-law is a photographer and his 35 mm system is Canon. I so admire his work that I didn't want to go against his system of choice. (In all fairness to Nikon and Minolta, he told me I couldn't go wrong with either system. He is a Canon man because the first 35 mm camera he purchased was a Canon and he found himself happy.) Also, there might be some lens borrowing in the future.

I picked the Elan 7 rather than a Rebel because I wanted mirror lockup. I will be shooting nature mostly on tripods.
 
G

Guest

I have stuck with Canon, since the 1980's with a A1. Good build quality, superb lenses, Now using a EOS 30 and a EOS 500 as a back up, I love the eyecontol focus on the 30. I'll wait and see what happens with digital as I still want to use my EOS lenses, the current digital EOS camera's are overpriced, and the EOS D60 has already been discountinued. I wonder if a digital camera bought now will still be used in fourty years time, I'm still using a vintage Canonet19.
 
G

Guest

You will be real lucky if any of todays digital cameras still function in te= n=20 years I seriously doubt if any current digital will be usable in 20 with the= =20 changes in tech. Not only does the camera still have to be functioning but=20 you have to be able to find media cards and batteries that work with it. NOT= =20 to mention a computor that will still be able to talk to the camera as well=20 as ink for the printer that will connect to the computer the camera can talk= =20 to.=20

I have 10 year old 5 1/4" floppys That I have no way to recover the info on.= =20 The digital camera will go the same way only much much faster. Contact canon= =20 and ask them how far back their support goes I bet many of their 5+ year old= =20 digitals are already blowin in the wind....

By the way my 1953 Leica IIIf RD 1959 Leica IIIg Rangefinders just got back=20 from a complete overhall should be good for another 40 years. Bring your D30= =20 we can got out shooting.=20

Mark W.

Canonitis FD sufferer and collector of 1950s rangefinder cameras including=20 Braun/Paxettes and Leica LTM cameras and optics

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Don't meddle in the affairs of Dragons, as you are crunchy and taste good=20 with ketchup! =20
 
G

Guest

I have gone the EOS route perhaps because my father had a venerable Ftbn SLR, with a 50 1.2 lens. Rock solid and dependable. So in 1991 I bought my first SLR, the EOS 1000, and a couple of lenses. Not rock solid, but dependable (still sees some use today, from my brother). EOS cameras fall naturally into one's hands, the control layout does not get into the way.
I have grown as a photographer, and EOS has been there all the way. Today I have the 1V, rock solid and dependable.
 
G

Guest

Moved to Canon as part of my switch to digital. Also my wrists were pretty badly broken in a motorcycle accident so IS is very nice to have and the angle of the shutter release on the 1D suits my fingers whereas the D1 series Nikons do not.
 
G

Guest

I am hanging on to my F-1, it does need an overhaul. It may outlast the RebelG and the G3, but they are all keepers for me. (I know, too many cameras...) Then there is the Minolta Autocord 2.25 sq TLR-my oldest manual camera. I had a 2.25x3.25 Graflex-but sold that. Excellent camera, was in excellent shape-well taken care of for the age, but did not use it much.

I live in humidity hell-Louisiana, so silica gel bags go in the camera bags, and am taking to keeping my cameras in freezer zip lock bags.
 
G

Guest

All the major camera companies put out great cameras and lenses. But........... Canon has the edge with its IS lenses, Its long focal length lenses are awsome with IS and now DO tech. More speed -1V film, and 1D digital for sports. All you have to do is look at any major sporting event and you will see the majority of lenses are canon.
 
G

Guest

I wouldn't expect to get more than 10 years out of a digital anything. Even with a $2000 price tag on the D60 if you use it moderately for 5 years you've recouped your investment several times over in comparison to having to send out for 35mm processing. I'll be happy to lay down another 2 grand in 5 years for what will probably be approaching a 20-30mp chip that I pray I will be able to use my existing lenses with.

I went with Canon because of my existing lenses and the deep line of accessories. I am a bit miffed off they have already discontinued it. It makes me wonder why since the demand is way higher than availability? What's wrong with it?

As far as accessing a 5-1/4" floppy...the used drives are $5 at your local neighborhood computer store and they still install just like any other floppy.
 
G

Guest

Digital system is the most attractive point to move to Canon systems. Read all the reviews about digital camera in the net, Canon delivers the best performance in term of Low Noise pictures, efficient battery consumption, full frame sensor, IS lens technology.
 
G

Guest

I used Minolta kit for many years - ending up with a pair of 9's - plus most of the faster lenses, this was for the newspaper work I am involved in - Now Minolta advavtage is that lens for lens glass is just as good, but size and weight is less (try out a Minolta 600 f4 - against a Canon or Nikon) then you will see what i am trying to convey!

But my paper went Digital for pix, Minolta do not make a digital inter-changeable lens body, suitable for news work - so I had a word with my dealer - result, he took all the Minolta kit, and supplied Canon digital SLR kit and lenses to suit. So far the only failing that I have found on the change is that Minolta had a focus confirmation light in the viewfinder for follow focus work - and Canon, so far, do not?
On the plus side, apart from memory card instead of film, is IS lenses. Let me assure all the film lovers that I also got hold of an EOS 3 - other kit I have is: Pentax 6x4.5; Leica M6; and Sinar 5x4 - but my working kit is the Canon EOS digital kit!
 
G

Guest

Was the Dimage 7 or (better yet) 7i available at the time? I find myself using it in place of my Canon and Olympus SLR kits most of the time.
 
G

Guest

I originally started using a Minolta Maxxum system in High school, and latter to a Nikon system beginning of college. At the time the F4s and N90s was a great choice for sports, which is what I focused in in my photojournalism degree. However once I got a chance to give a 1N RS a spin, I was blown away by not only the speed, but the overall advancement in technology. This was especially true of the pelical mirror, USM lenses, CFs, flash system, and overall user-friendly design. I sold my Nikon system and went Canon from that day on.

Since then I have not regretted my decision. I am still using my film-based bodies, as well as the L lenses I purchased over 8 years ago. They are still going strong after years of tough use.

Recent additions of IS lenses only further my happiness of Canon. This is truly innovative technology at work.

When it came time to consider digital, I found the D30 quite impressive. What it gave up in overall build quality, it more than made up in terms of image quality. As I anxioulsy await the time to upgrade to a pro-level Canon digital, all my EOS gear has never failed me.

The new equipment by the other companies are quite impressive indeed. And I don't argue the other products are equally exceptional. I feel that the Canon system has so much room for growth due to their embrace of electronics from early on. The EOS system and even prosumer digicams are very well thought out for growth.

Of all the features Canon offers, I am in love with the e-ttl flash system. If only wireless ttl was around when I was in school!

I just got the black g2 and am amazed at how well it integrates with the wireless e-ttl system. Simply awesome. This is the kind of expandability and potential i'm talking about
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G

Guest

I started off at some single-digit age taking pictures using my own "dispoable" cameras -- pinhole cameras made by taping a foil-covered box to a 126 cartridge and winding it with a nickle. Little did I know I was years ahead of my time! ;) Then I had a Kodak 110 (disposable flash bars anyone?) that I used for years. I experimented with every other camera I could get my hands on, including my mother's 126 film point-and-shoot, my father's SLR (I forget the make, not Canon, Nikon, or Minolta -- something else beginning with "M" though), various Polaroids (expensive at $1 a shot), and even 8mm movie cameras.

Finally, my older brother bought the newly-released (at the time) A-1. I think I shot as many rolls of film using it as he did, maybe more.
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I even used it in my high school photojournalism course.

I've been a fan of Canon gear ever since. Don't get me wrong -- other brands have great stuff. I just prefer the design philosophy, control layouts, etc., of Canon.

The first SLR I personally bought was an EOS 850 (no manual control -- I gave it away) followed by an Elan, and Elan IIe. My current primary film body is an EOS 3. In recent years I have been replacing my non-L lenses with L lenses. I used to think these were overly expensive until I started realizing just how much sharper and more capable they were. It didn't hurt to compare their prices to equivalent Nikon glass either!

I'm keeping the Elan as a backup (because it's quieter than the Elan IIe, and any EOS 3 owner can tell you why you occasionally need a quiet camera) and giving the Elan IIe as a gift to a good friend and photographer hoping to graduate from the point-and-shoot world. I recently picked up an original F-1, mainly for playing around with astrophotography and other extremely long exposures.

I also use a Powershot G1, which is great for its portability, manual controls, and similarity of operation to EOS SLRs. As someone else mentioned, it's even compatible with wireless E-TTL flash -- mostly. I waited for Canon to release a 5MP point-and-shoot, and apparently they now have, but unfortunately not (yet) in the Powershot Gx line, so no hot shoe, etc.
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Now I've ordered an EOS 10D, which will be my first DSLR. I can't wait for it to arrive!

I'll still shoot film, but mostly when I need to opt for the best quality and highest resolution. (I use a 4000dpi scanner. The "dark room" is already all digital.)
 
G

Guest

Hi all, glad to be here! I started out with a Miranda Fv back in the 60's. Got my first canon (FTb) in the 70's. Loved the simple layout of the controls and the "hockey puck" quality of the body. (apologies to Marty Forscher). What I loved the most was the large defined meter area. I found I could average high contrast ranges by simply splitting the meter box between them. In the 80's I got my first F1(old) because I wanted the interchangeable finders and not lose the metering. In the 90's I was lured by the Contax's and traded my F1 for an RTSII. I liked the lenses alot but have never gotten real comfortable with having the shutterspeed dial on the left. I much prefer to change speeds with my right index finger and apertures with my left hand. Soooo... I recently had a chance to pick up a mint 1980 F1 and speedfinder and will never let it go! Another thing I prefer about the old FD lenses was the breech mount, especially the 2nd generation ones. They were spring loaded so merely pressing them to the camera the breech collar would rotate and hold the lens. You had to fully rotate the collar to finish mounting but it did make lens changing a one handed afair if necessary. I for one am glad that canon doesn't support these anymore as I now can get those great old lenses at prices far below what comparable nikon mf lenses still go for. I also prefer an all manual/mechanical camera as my contax is a paperweight if the battery dies, the old F1 just keeps on going. LONG LIVE FILM!!
 
Hi,
I used Canon AE1 for a 7 yrs and now i am planning to buy a AF camera. i was not able to decide whether to buy Rebel Ti or Elan 7.after reading lot of reviews i decided to buy Rebel Ti. most people advised to buy Elan 7 b'cos its rated higher than the Rebel series, but the major differences i can see between Elan 7(NOT ELAN 7E) & Rebel Ti is the shutter speed of 1/4000 & 4fps. since i decided to keep my budget not to cross $350, i am planning to buy Rebel Ti. plz let me know if i am making a good choice for this price and if there are any othere models for this price plz let me know.I am planning to buy at B&H,NY.

please reply ASAP, Thank You.
 
A

anthonymdavis

I have used (and still do) a Canon F-1. It is a workhorse that you just can't kill. I had to get a battery adapter years ago, other than that it works fine.

I'd like to move into the digital side of things. Do any of the old lenses work with the digital stuff?
 

iberger

Well-Known Member
If the F-1 uses the old breechblock lens mount, I think not. If it uses the same mount as the EOS, all Canon's current digital SLRs can use the same lenses.

However, all but one of these SLRs have sensors smaller than a 35mm frame; filling this smaller area is equivalent to increasing the focal length. So a 24mm lens for an EOS film camera will give the same field of view on these digital cameras as a 32- to 38mm lens would on a regular EOS. On the other hand, this makes a 200 mm lens the equivalent of a 300 or 320.
 
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