Yashica FRII FRI

paulcontax

Well-Known Member
I have the FR and the FR1 and both are built very solid.
Some may find them too big or too heavy - mechanically they're of top-quality !
Someone said, they're built like the first Contax RTS - but you can get them much cheaper !

If they had a mechanical shutter I'd love them even more. This is the only thing I worry about : Electronic shutter with the need of batteries.
What I like with the FR (no AE) :
You can see everything in the viewfinder for chosen time and apperture are permanent shown mechanically.

Both cameras now need some helping hand : Light comes in from the back side and I need to replace the stripes myself because otherwise it's too expensive at Yashica....
Hope to get some advise for that... !

Paul
 

alex

New Member
Paul,

>Light comes in from the back side and I need to replace the stripes myself because otherwise it's too expensive at Yashica....<

If you mean the light seals, that's an easy home job. I've done my RTS and my three Yashicas, not to mention a number of compacts. (I got carried away with success.)

You need: a sharp cutting (craft) knife, a ruler, some cocktail sticks and cotton wool pads, some lighter fuel, small sharp scissors, and a standard black mouse mat. Clean out the old light seals (which may have reduced to a sticky mess) with the cocktail sticks and clean out the residue from the grooves by working small pieces of cotton wool d&ened in lighter fuel through them with a cocktail stick. This is far and away the most time-consuming part. I covered the shutter with gently tacked down 'Post-it' notes cut to size, to make sure no debris got on to the shutter mechanism or blades. Make sure the grooves are thoroughly clean. Using the ruler and craft knife, cut some long strips of mouse mat about 2 mm wide, and longer than the camera grooves. Trim the depth to fit the grooves. Start feeding the mouse mat strips in from one end, pushing it home with a cocktail stick. If you stretch the strips slightly when feeding them in, so that they're a little thinner, you'll find that they contract and expand again in the groove, making a snug fit so that you don't need any glue to hold them in place. You'll need two strips for the groove that has the little lever or sensor that detects when the camera door is closed, cutting them at an angle thus ==\ /== to fit snugly under the sensor. You want it light tight around the sensor, but don't want to impede the function of the sensor when the camera back is closed. It's fiddly and time consuming the first time you do it, but it's not a difficult task at all. A little trial and error will show the width and depths you need for the strips. I've done about eight cameras and still have over half the mouse mat left. Usual caveats about working with lighter fuel in enclosed spaces.

Alex
 

paulcontax

Well-Known Member
Thanx a lot for your help : I'll try it next weekend ! In the meantime I'll use my Contax 137MA for the best shots with Planar an= d Sonnar lenses. But I really like the Yashica best....
 
A

adam_f

I am thinking of buying an FR-II because I've seen one in immaculate condition. Apart from missing full manual mode, is everything else the same (quality-wise) as the other FRs? Obviously I would prefer manual, aperture in the VF and DOF preview but I haven't been able to find an FR-I in good condition.


Thanks,
Adam F
 

matthias

Active Member
You may search for a RTS or RTS2. They have all what you want and can use most of the accessories for the FR (Winder! ) matthias
 
A

adam_f

Well the cheapness of the FR-series obviously appeals too...for under US$50 I could then afford a CZ lens to go with it (maybe ;)).

Re: the comment on the FR having the aperture and shutter speed mechanically displayed, does the FR-I not? Also I notice the FR has a CdS meter whereas the FR-I and FR-II use SPA, any comments on the difference?


Thanks,
Adam F
 
A

adam_f

Does anyone else here own an FR? I'm having trouble finding info - there are references to red and green LEDs which don't sound very mechanical to me (referring to the post by Paul Fox).

Also, why would the FR have an electronic shutter if it has no A mode?

Adam F
 

swoolf

Well-Known Member
> Does anyone else here own an FR? I'm having trouble finding info -> there are references to red and green LEDs which don't sound very> mechanical to me (referring to the post by Paul Fox).> > Also, why would the FR have an electronic shutter if it has no A mode?

I used to have one and the meter and shutter are electronic - I seem to recall that the shutter will work at 1/60th sec or thereabouts without a battery...... Steve
 

paulcontax

Well-Known Member
Hi Adam,

You wrote : "there are references to red and green LEDs which don't sound very mechanical to me (referring to the post by Paul Fox). Also, why would the FR have an electronic shutter if it has no A mode?"

Yes, there are LEDs for the light metering.

And Yes : The exposure times are constantly shown in the viewfinder. With the FR1 (AE mode) it's different when used in manual mode. The selected exposure time is not (constantly) shown in the viewfinder. When set on AE mode the exposure time is shown with a needle - but only when pressing on the button for metering or release.

and again YES : The FR-types all have electronic shutter. When you don't have batteries in they will not release. Even the FR is only manual that doesn't mean it's shutter is mechanical....

Paul
 

dok69

New Member
>Hi Adam, I have bot a FR and a FR2 which my wife used to use. The FR shutter will not fire without a battery being present. It uses horizontally running cloth blinds with a flash synchronisation speed of 1/60. There is no fully automatic mode. The lens aperture is indicated by a pointer and scale overlying the top of the view finder image, the shutter speed by a pointer and scale overlying the right hand side of the viewfinder image. the correct exposure is indicated by the use of three LEDs linked to aperture and shutter. Only one illuminates at a time, a red one at the top for overexposure, a green one in the middle for correct exposure and a red one at the bottom for underexposure. It is possible to adjust the exposure to within 0.5 of a stop using these LEDs. They are situated to the right of the image in the viewfinder. They can be a little difficult to see in bright sunlight. The meter uses a CDS cell. The FR2 has only fully automatic, B and Flash settings on the shutter. Therefore the only fixed speed being the Flash setting at 1/60. The metering system uses a silicon photo diode. The shutter is similar to the FR. There is no aperture indication in the Viewfinder but the shutter speed being used is indicated by a pointer and scale overlying the right hand side of the viewfinder image. Exposure compensation +/- 2 stops is available but depth of field preview is not, nor is the back removable (unlike the FR). Both cameras have a diagonal split image on the focusing screen. Both bodies are the same size and feel solid being slightly larger than the the 139 but feeling significantly heavier (Which is why I usually use the 139). Interestingly it is easier to load film into the FR series bodies than the 139 as it is not necessary to engage a sprocket hole on the film leader on a peg. Also the film take up spool winds the film emulsion side in rather than facing out. As far as I can tell from the brochure the FR1 was very similar to the FR2 but in addition had manual settings for the shutter and the same aperture indication, depth of field preview and removable back as the FR.

Richard M
 
A

adam_f

Thanks Paul and Richard,

It looks as though the FR1 is clearly better than the other two, but the only ones I have been able to find recently have the non-working frame counter problem. I guess I'll just have to be patient.


Thanks again, you've been most helpful!
Adam F
 
W

wojo

Richard,
You bring up an interesting point about the FR series that anyone contemplating buying one should be aware of. The company that made all the "real" film in the world and packaged it in little yellow boxes decided that they could save millions of feet of film by shortening the leader on each roll. The FR take-up spool winds the film over the top, and combined with the "fingers" used to secure the beginning of the roll makes for an unsecure film advance system with the short film leaders found today. Your have to be sure the film is advancing by watching the rewind knob. It can slip off the take-up spool after two or three frames. Happened to me a lot. I started to burn five frames at the start of a roll, just to make sure the film hadn't slipped off. That, combined with the typical non-working film counter gave one to many surprises.
The FR I is a nice, solid body. The battery lasts forever, or seems to....
The only other quibble I have is with its remote shutter release. It uses a push on bayonet. It comes out rather easily. Not commonly found, either. There's an adapter to use the current screw in style remote release, however it, too is uncommon.
The FX 3 is a great back-up, or travel camera. Lightweight, compact, and reliable. Totally manual, with basically a match needle exposure indicator that uses LED's instead of a meters pointer. It has a mechanical shutter that works in any weather, modern take-up spool that winds underneath, and an old style mechanical remote shutter release found almost anywhere. About the only thing that it doesn't do well is follow rapidly changing lighting, whereas the FR I has aperture priority automatic exposure, a big plus in nightclubs.
Both bodies can bought insanely cheaply on ebay, and a quite a bargain. The FR I was not an inexpensive camera when it was being produced. I paid over a weeks wages (my measure of inflation adjustment) for a kit that included the body, a 50mm 1.7 ML lens and "neverready" case...(great lens BTW)
Pardon the lengthy post,
Joe W
 
W

writing4me

This has been an interesting thread. I'm glad this was all brought up. Just a slightly off topic comment since there was talk about the film take up spools on the FR-series. On my FX-103, although I love the camera, I often mumble some unkind words at it while trying to convince the film leader to slip into that little slot and the notches to fit over the peg. I find my Contaflex easier and faster by far to load than my FX-103, even accounting for the Contaflex's removable back and drop out film spool. I have had some trouble with mounting of the slide films out of my FX-103 lately too - in that the frames line up in a slightly inconvenient way for the slide mounting machine. SOME machines invariably catch a corner and slices a frame or two. (Of course the best frames!) and I'm told it is due to my camera's method of placement. (The same labs don't slice rolls of film from my other cameras) Just an interesting off topic bit of information. -Lynn L.
 

bobbl46

Well-Known Member
Adam et al.....

Faulty FR (& I's & II's) frame counters are common.

They use a nylon(?) gear on a steel shaft. The gear can either slip on the shaft through heavy use (superglue fix!) or the gear can split (replacement only fix)

The push-fit remote is not a big deal.... and there seem to be enough around in the UK including the screw thread to push-fit adapter (R6SJ?) to make it a side-issue. I assume the USA has similar supplies.

Out of interest.... I reckon the FR is a tad heavier than the FRI & FRII .... gives the impression that it is more solidly built .... but in reality they all seem to be "good old bricks" with the emphasis on "good"!

I've never had film-loading problems with my FR, FRI, FRII or FX3 Super 2000.....guess I was brought up on older, crankier cameras!

My least favourite of the FR’s is the FRII - Auto only, and my favourite is the FRI - a "does everything" camera - almost fully compatible with all RTS and RTS II accessories. If I was forced to make a choice ... I’d still pick the FX-3 Super 2000 as my desert island camera because of its mechanical shutter, even though it doesn't take a motor winder or have d-o-f preview!

I’ll admit that frame spacing of any of them is not quite as even as Contax.

Never had an FX-103 ... It seems too close to the 139Q to not bother buying anything other than the Contax! I suppose S/H price differences might sway my opinion.

Cheers, Bob.

p.s. I like they way they moved the battery check light off the FR's top plate to the FRI's and FRII's frame counter!
 
A

adam_f

To all those who have owned both cameras, is the FR's CdS meter noticeably different (e.g. slower) from the SPD one in the other two cameras? I'm told that SPD cells work better in dark conditions...but I'm pretty sure the old spotmatic we have lying around has a CdS meter and it is fine...

Thanks, Adam F
 

bobbl46

Well-Known Member
Adam ... I've not noticed any practical difference in speed of use or speed of metering under changing light conditions.

The FR seems slower to use because you have to alter the aperture or shutter speed to get "correct" exposure. With the FRI & FRII on Auto, you'll get a "correct" exposure without altering either (assuming the exposure is somewhere within the film speeds range
). Of course, it might not be the preferred one!

Cheers, Bob. >WHO TYPED HIS MESSAGE HERE!
 

joanjordi

Active Member
Bob, this link probably can help you:

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!


But the word "reapreta" isn't in this dictionary, but you can find "apretar".

"Reapreta" one can translate as "tighten again"
 

bobbl46

Well-Known Member
Sorry if this appears twice .... first one seemed to disappeared into the ether! It read (something like...)

Thanks Joan ... Now that we have the missing word, our Chilean friend’s message seems to be ...

“Tighten again the screw axis of the dial accountant and is fixed”

Now, I’m not sure if this little pearl is directly related to my comment about dodgy FR frame counters ... It doesn’t seem to be (if you re-read my original message), but I’m sure Francisco can be helpful to this group if he has such knowledge (and we can translate the whole message!).

Forgive me Francisco, I am no linguist (except in Scouse!) and rely heavily on Babelfish to do the work!

Cheers, Bob.
 

joanjordi

Active Member
>

Well, My english isn't good enough to judge if the translation is correct. It seems in someone's camera the dial axis screw has come loose and, due this, the camera has some kind of misfunction...but I haven't encountered that in any message in this discussion brand. Perhaps Francisco can explain his message.
 
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