Yashica magnifier F2N

ante_portas

Active Member
I have bought Yashica magnifier (2x) for my cameras. I wanted to increase comfort of watching and accuracy of focusing. I never seen it and when it got by post, I was annoyed by its size! It is unbelievably small. And this item should help you to magnify something.. ridiculous! Who designed it, for heavens sake? Input eyepiece is about only 5mm wide or so, how can I hit it?
Only what can help is good big eyepiece rubber as I consider, do you know if exists any for this *fly*??
THNX, Pavel
PS: yashica right angle is a rather better, but also stupidly small (5cm!). Maybe this items from Contax are biger, who knows? I got used to thinking in RX or RTS dimensions :); this is opposite extreme! :-(
 
Well, I bought a Contax magnifier (I do not recall the model) for my Yashica 108...
I have to say it is small too (a few cm long),
BUT it does have a big, rubber eyepiece....

Nothing to say, quite comfortable to use!

I will see if on the leaflet is named the code
of a spare rubber eyepiece...
Regards
Paolo
 

bobbl46

Well-Known Member
The 5mm exit pupil is all that the average person needs ..... as one gets older the pupil has a smaller maximum opening .... 5mm is normal for 30+ age.

The RA Finder has a larger exit glass, but then it does not magnify the screen, unlike the 2x magnifier.

The Contax and Yashica magnifiers are identical. In general the Contax and Yashica RA Finders are identical.

Olympus used to make a very desireable Varimagnifinder that had a switcheable 1x or 2.5x (if memory serves me correctly)magnification. It did fit on to Contaxes of the RTS, 139, 137 and 159 sliding type eyepiece accessory grooves. This too has a small exit pupil size!

Your magnifier should have been supplied with a rubber eyecup that is pretty much identical to those fitted to standard Contax and Yashica circular slide-on eyecups. Maybe one of those will fit the magnifier.

Cheers, Bob.
 

tbc

Well-Known Member
Pavel, The Yashica magnifier is made for critical focusing. It is only good for deliberate picture taking. You have to remove it to be able to see the whole frame. I find that using the 2x magnifier seems to help the most when you look at the fine groundglass area of the screen rather than the microprism or split image. If you want easier and more accurate focusing, you might try changing the screen to one that suits your vision and preferences better.
 

ante_portas

Active Member
Hey Guys,
you are trying to convince me that the size is OK but is not. Supposing it was designed for increasing the comfort of looking& accurate of focusing. How can process that righ when input eyepiece is smaller than viewframe itself.
IMveryHO it should be minimaly as wide as viewfinder where here it is output. I have expected funnel-shape. Now I do not argue if it works properly or not but have doubs seeing it is so small. And image is rather distant...
This soltution seems me a little bit unhappy. Here can help only eyepiece rubber.
Removing of focusing screen was the firs thing I have done when bought camera with removable screens. I am using telelenses. But time to time I need very precise focusing (long lens x open aperture). Thinking about magnifier, I am hesitating.
Just a couple my notices in the course of testing in practice. Pavel
 

bobbl46

Well-Known Member
I can see you're not easily convinced!

It is a common problem for astrophotographers who use dim(!) viewfinders in 35mm cameras. Accuracy of focussing is paramount for stargazers who don't want globular stars.... they want pinpoints.

Try doing a search on astro sites for camera eyepiece magnifiers. I hope you are not dissappointed when you see that the higher the magnification you go the less of the viewfinder screen you see. Some have tried to compromise and try to get a bit of each. They usually abandon the split image viewfinder screens for plain screens too (if they can!)

Look also at Hartmann masks.....mainly for stars agains the black sky....but might give you some food for thought, depending on what your subject is!

Cheers, Bob.
 
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