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Yashica T Zoom

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Guest

Hi, Leo. I am Lam Ching Chung from U Hall. of Hong Kong U. Supprise?

I use a T2. According to your slide experience, which P&S has the best lens? Which lab are using for slide and photos?

BTW, send me a personal email if you are free.

Regard, Jose Lam joselam@netvigator.com >
 
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Guest

Hi Dan!

I really agree with You, comparison with a Zoom is not fair. Sorry!

Regards Wolfgang
 
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Guest

Can anyone tell me if the new T4 Zoom has a lens cover that deploys automatically when the camera is powered down?

Thanks,
Dave
 
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Guest

Dave, the answer is yes. On power-down, a small shutter flicks across the lens, and the barrel retracts to a nearly flush position. The protection is sufficient for dust and fingers, but it doesn't match a robust clamshell.
 
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Guest

I took 4 rolls of Fuji 400 Superia print film with my new T4 Zoom. All pictures were taken indoors.

no shots out of focus;
flash exposure quite good;
viewfinder squinty;
need to get use to small body;
images not sharper than my P&S Samsung with
Schneider lens;
low light or low contrast triggered flash 2x.
makes it tricky when taking pictures of
children;
no distortion at any focal length;
good color.

Can anyone in the US recommend a high quality mail-in lab for print film? The No. 1 mega store in my area sends film to a Fuji Mini Lab (NJ). Do they do good work?
Thanks for your help. (dkramer@clarkhill.com)
 
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Guest

>I have gone to A&I here in Hollywood. They are also a mail-in lab. Check >aandi.com I believe is their website.
 
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Guest

Has anyone experienced rapid battery discharge with a Contax Tvs. Mine was fine, then suddenly it seems to drain the battery in the normal, flash in auto mode. This appears to occur even when the camera is switched off.
Please advise
 
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Guest

Ming Ting,

Thanks for the info on A & I. Have you used them with some regularity, and do you consider their processing to be HIGH quality?

Any evaluative comments would be appreciated.


Many thanks.
 
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Guest

I had my T4 Zoom for three months. It's just a point & shoot camera with contax name. Available light photos without flash is good. With flash, my photos look ordinary. The long exposure timing is welcome, but only with hand held metering & wide open aperature. Exposure compensation of +1.5 or -1.5 is limiting. Spot metering is great, very accurate.
 
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Guest

Got my wish for Christmas: a T4 Zoom. Impressions thus far: I think it's a great little camera for under $200. I quickly learned that red-eye is inevitable when shooting with flash at the longer focal lengths in typical evening conditions indoors, with or without the anti-red-eye feature. And the photographer has little control over the exposure. The +/- 1.5 compensation is not really useful. However, I have learned to trust the camera under most conditions. I snapped off a roll of slide film day before yesterday in bright, sunny conditions, and was surprised to find the exposures absolutely correct in almost every instance. The only way I could induce flare was to include the 11 a.m. Texas sun in the frame, and then I only got some veiling flare. The transparencies were sharp and saturated at all focal lengths. As soon as my scanner gets back from warranty repair (a month gone so far) I'll post a few. The T4 is a heck of a bargain.
 
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Guest

Popular Photography will review the Yashica T4 Zoom in the March issue. In an e-mail I asked Dan Richards to name the best lens of any point & shoot zoom his magazine has tested and he named the Contax TVS III (of course!). He suggested the Yashica as a cheaper alternative, so I take it the review will be a positive one.
 
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Guest

Finally got my scanner "fixed." It was the computer, not the scanner, of course. Attached are first shots with T4 Zoom on 100 speed slide film (Kodak pro Ektachrome SW). Framing isn't the best, still getting used to the difference between what the viewfinder shows and what I get on film. The swan, I thought, was a good test of the metering system; the backlit scene at the fountain with the sun just outside the frame showed little flare; the shot of the Capitol Building in Austin shows some 28mm distortion of the little fountain pond, but nothing offensive, in my view. The lack of exposure control is offset by a good metering system, a really nice lens, and the sub-$200 cost.
73056.jpg
73057.jpg
73058.jpg
 
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Guest

Some people have commented that the flash is not too good on the T Zoom, but I find it to be excellent. I recently took some shots with flash on Fuji Provia 400F slide film. The skin tones came out perfectly despite the white clothes of the subject.

S&le images can be seen here:
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Sincerely,

Craig
 
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Guest

I agree that the flash is good with 400 speed film, but mine is a bit limited with 100 speed transparency film. See attachment, shot with Elite Chrome 100 to e-mail to my wife on vacation so she'd know the cat is still busily driving me nuts knocking the magazines and papers off the coffee table...
76124.jpg
 
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Guest

Tom, what you are seeing is not a limitation of the Yashica T Zoom, but a problem of on-camera flash per se. Even if you took that shot with a Nikon F5 and the most expensive Nikon Flash on the camera, or a Contax N1 and a TLA 360 on the camera, it would look the same. The reason is because there is so much depth in the scene. The flash illumination drops off according to the inverse square law as you get further away from the flash tube. I see in your photo that the cat's head and the newspaper are very well exposed. The Yashica has done a good job of flash exposure. What's wrong with the photo is the poor overall illumination of the whole scene behind the cat, and that can only be solved by a different lighting technique, such as bounce flash. There is nothing wrong with the T Zoom's flash as such. Any "on-camera" flash would make exactly the same photo. Even the Contax T3. This issue can only be solved by off-camera flash, bounced off a wall or off the ceiling, or a supplementary slave flash strategically placed to illuminate the background. Faster film helps because it puts the background ambient light two stops closer to the flash illumination of the subject. That goes for any camera.

Regards,

Craig
 
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Guest

Craig, of course you are right on every count. Thanks for the reminders. I had all that drilled into me in photo courses in college more than 40 years ago and should have at least remembered about faster film bringing the background up closer to the flash illumination of the subject. No excuses, but I seldom use flash except as fill any more. My studio lights have been in a closet for more than a decade. My chief complaint about the little in-camera flashes is the difficulty of avoiding red-eye in typical room illumination. Usual solution is to turn the flash off and move my subject to where there is some light coming through a window and use a reflector to fill in the shadow side. Thanks again. Regards, Tom
 
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Guest

Hi Tom. You're welcome for the reminders. I have to remind myself regularly that there are limitations in the technology, and that the technique is more important than the technology.

I agree completely about on camera flashes. I only use them as a last resort, and then only when there isn't much depth in the scene. As long as the bulk of the scene is within a similar range of distance from the camera, and the ambient light isn't too far below the flash level, we can get an acceptable result which is better than no shot at all.

I acknowledge your very long experience as a photographer, and make my comments with all due respect.

Sincerely,

Craig
 
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