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Zeiss lenses on 20D

L

ltsdnce

Have any 20D owners mounted zeiss lenses on the camera? What adaptor would you use? I know there are several out there, from Shell, cameraquest, and zoerk...are these all about the same?
Thanks for your help,
Susan
 

cyclist2

Member
> I would also be interested in Zeiss lenses for the 10D. I have a Hasselblad Zeiss 80mm plus several Zeiss lenses from my Contax. I think I read somewhere a while ago that Zeiss could be used with an adapter, but I don't > remember which adapter.

Anne B.

>
 

deshojo

Well-Known Member
I have recently purchased a 20D, having used Contax and T* lenses for 20 years, and am using the Cameraquest adapter to enable my Zeiss lenses to be utilised.

The results are variable, from slightly difficult to absolutely stunning.

I have the 21mm f2.8, 25mm f2.8, 50mm f1.7, 100mm f2.8 Makro Planar, 28-85mm f3.3-4 and the 100-300mm f4-5.6.

Firstly I would say that the quality of engineering and ease of the use of the Cameraquest adapter are excellent. No tools required and no slack or wobble experienced. It's expensive at US$175, but worth the money.

The problems I have found are mainly difficulty in focussing accurately at distance. The screeen on the 20D is obviously designed primarily for autofocus so there are no focussing aids like split screen etc. The screen is also a little dark, which adds difficulty when using the 100-300mm at the long end at f5.6.

The aperture stop down is not automatic, so stopping down to f11 gives a very dark screen. You have to focus wide open and then stop down to take the picture (if required).
I seems that the slight thickness of the adapter means that infinity focus is not actually at the infinity mark on the lens (you're moving the lens a couple of mm away from the sensor plane), so the scale becomes less useful. I'm sure with tests one could find out the exact focus point and place a new mark (removable of course!) on the lens barrel.

The results though are worth the effort as quality digital cameras tend to reveal flaws in lenses, and the quality of Zeiss really shows through.

The results with the 100mm Makro Planar in particular are nothing short of amazing. I was genuinely astonished after interpolating a 1:1 image up to 30"x20". Just stunning quality, sharpness and detail like you wouldn't believe, and of course that undefinable richness that only seems to come with Zeiss T* lenses. It is better than with any film I have used.

I have come to the conclusion that I shall keep certain lenses, notably the 21mm, 50mm and 100mm Makro, but use canon at the telephoto end.
Canon's telephoto lenses are excellent (I have the 70-200mm f2.8 IS USM and is it superb, I have also ordered a 300mm f2.8 IS which is also reputed to be extraordinarily good). You get quality lenses with the benefit of very fast autofocus and wide apertures.

However, Canon's wide angle lenses are nothing in comparison with Zeiss and this is why I shall keep the 21mm T* along with an RTS body and use film when I want the full 21mm (the 1.6 crop factor on the 20D makes it about a 33mm), but the quality is so much better than the Canon 17-40mm f4(which has shown some chromatic aberration and is nowhere near as sharp).

The Makro Planar could not be beaten by anything from what I've seen, and autofocus is not really required for macro work as I tend to move the camera in and out to focus, so this is a definite keeper and will probably be the most used combination (if you don't have one get one, you will not be disappointed).

Anyway I've rambled. Feel free to ask if there is anything specific you want to know.
Cheers,
Matt
 

deshojo

Well-Known Member
Bit of a non-sequeteur but...
I would steer clear of micro drives. Moving parts are never as reliable as solid state technology such as compact flash.
I've heard of people losing important work with a crashing micro drive.
 

irakly

Well-Known Member
Matt, this is a bit of overstatement. Haven't you heard of people loosing information because of crashing solid-state CF cards? Well, I am the one. Microdrives have their drawbacks, but if you handle them with reasonable care, they do deliver.
Speaking of Hitachi, one ofmy students shoots Canon 1Ds with Hitachi microdrive, and everything seeems swell. Canon battery is so powerful and power management is so efficient that we did not notice any degradation in battery life.
 

deshojo

Well-Known Member
Hi Irakly,
I hadn't heard of crashing CF cards actually, but now I have (I've only recently moved to digital). Was the information recoverable using image rescue software?
P.S. You're right about those Canon batteries - they go on forever.
 

molley

Well-Known Member
>I had a CF card crash on me a couple of weeks ago and the only programme >that would cope was Photo Rescue .
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!


>The trial programme is available free but to save any recovered pics you >have to pay around $34 US. Well worth it as I recovered all 64 pics ...Stuart
 

irakly

Well-Known Member
Most image rescue software works well with jpeg images, but sometimes errs on raw files. Once I shot a job with 10d, and CF card crashed. It was in Russia, on a tour with a theatre. I managed to find internet access and downloaded sandisk software. It recovered all files but one, which was the most important.
 
D

djg

This CF / Microdrive exchange would be nice on its own thread so people can find it. BTW, CF cards don't crash since they have no heads or revolving platter to crash into
happy.gif
. But I guess thay can fail like any physical component, though I haven't had that experience yet.

DJ
 

molley

Well-Known Member
>well they might not "crash " and they may "fail " but corrupt the data on >them they certainly can ...
 

molley

Well-Known Member
Posted by Matt Sallis (Shigitatsusawa) on Sunday, October 24, 2004 - 8:53 pm:

Can the image rescue software also be used on micro drives?

>I believe so ..
 

bobbytan

Well-Known Member
Matt, thanks for sharing your opinions about the Zeiss lenses on a Canon DSLR. After what you said, i think I will hold on to my last Zeiss lens - the 85mm/1.4 - which I think would be great for indoor/still life shots when you can take your time to focus.

I've had very little success manual-focussing on moving subjects - this is MUCH too hard especially when you are working with shallow DOF - unless you have superb eyesight. But with a still object and the camera on a tripod, I guess it's much easier to get tack sharp images.

Re microdrives vs solid-state CF cards, I've had BOTH cards fail me, but I too believe that the CF cards are generally more stable. I would also NOT use the slow cards on a 20D (it's okay for a 10D) i.e. anything slower than 40x. The best cards are the Sandisk Ultra II and Lexar Pro 80x. I have not tried the Extreme cards, but they should be at least just as good and possibly better/faster and more reliable.
 

bobbytan

Well-Known Member
A word of caution to those who are using Zeiss lenses on a Canon EOS body - you may scratch the plastic housing of the mirror chamber. I had quite prominent scratch marks on my 10D, and I am not sure which particular Zeiss lens caused this. The metal pin in the shape of a shark's fin on the back of the lens, if it's protruding a little too long, will scrape on the plastic housing when you mount and dismount the lens.
 

deshojo

Well-Known Member
Thanks for that caution Bobby, I'll check clearance issues on the 20D before using them again.
I think maybe the 20D mirror may be slightly further back because of the redesign re. the EFS lenses extending further into the body.
I recall reading somewhere that the pivot point on the mirror means it doesn't come as far forward when flipping up. I'm happy to be corrected on this though as it's just a vague recollection.
PS You won't regret keeping the 85mm, I hear it's a bit special.
 

cyclist2

Member
> That is useful info about cards. I have 3 brands and find them all about the same. My Transcend 512MB card was inadvertently sent through the laundry. It still works just fine after 6 months. Colors are still what they should > be in all pics. TG it was cold water. I'm sure a microdrive would have been zonked

>
 
D

djg

When I started reading "colors are still what they should be" I thought you were talking about the laundry
happy.gif
. Actually memory will either work or not - you won't start getting poor color saturation or greenish tints, you'll get a "please format card" or "can't read card" type of error.

I've been using 1GB Transcend on my ND with no problems, but we know that's not a warp-speed transfer in that camera.
 

stealth

Gold CI-Patron
Hello everybody

Just wanted do kindly ask you to stick to the topic. In this case, the topic is: Zeiss Lenses on 20D, not CF-Cards, not Rescue Software, not Microdrives or something else. Please use this forum as a forum and not as a mailing list.
It'll be much easier for information seekers to find something when information is structured.

Thank you in advance and enjoy posting!
Cheers
M;los
 

deshojo

Well-Known Member
Further to my original posting, regarding focussing issues, it now seems that I must have been doing something wrong when I performed the initial tests.
The infinity focus IS actually at the infinity mark using the cameraquest adapter, despite what I originally found.
Not sure what I was doing wrong then, very odd, but knowing now that the focus scale is accurate makes using the zeiss lenses on the 20D far easier.
Sorry if I misled anyone.
Matt.
 
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